Mud over latext paint?

When my home was built 15 years ago, there was some ugly taping on the ceiling in the upstairs hallway. I pointed it out at the final inspection, and it was 'repaired'. I'm now in the process of painting and have decided to fix it 'correctly'. A bit of mud and a little sanding should do it, but the ceiling has 2 coats of latex paint that I'm aware of. Can I simply mud on top of the latex paint? Or should I do some sort of surface preparation, first? Any other considerations?
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Never had a problem with mud over latex paint, in fact, it is common to fix problems that show up after the first coat of paint.

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I agree. Was a plasterer by trade and that's how we did our touch ups and renos. Never had a problem.

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Mike Hartigan wrote:

Joint compound will stick to glass until you scrape it off or it gets wet. It'll certainly stick to the paint.
I'm waging a war against drywall sanding. Unless you gob the stuff on there's little need to sand. Don't go into it expecting that you will have to sand. You _can_ do it without sanding.
Use progressively thinner coats, scrape off the goobers and ridges before the next coat, don't try to get it perfect on anything prior to the last coat, and use a spray bottle in your other hand to spritz the mud to keep it workable if it starts drying too fast.
R
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On Mon, 6 Mar 2006 21:06:12 -0600, Mike Hartigan

Yes, it will be fine.
You might consider a fine wet sponge rather than sanding.
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

Alas, my technique, while not bad, does not quite rise to the level of no-sanding. It's not a biggie, though. Maybe a bit of touch up around the edges - no real mess to worry about. And yes, I tend to use a wet sponge for small areas like this. My big concern, though, was the paint and it appears that I got the answer I was hoping for. Thanks to all who responded.
-Mike
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If it's a rough surface it may be tough but you can put several coats on wiping it tight till the joints dissapear

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On Mon, 6 Mar 2006 21:06:12 -0600, Mike Hartigan wrote:

As was pointed out, it sticks well. However, I have found that the premixed stuff (non-setting compound) looses it feathering with painting with a roller and the repair stands out. I have never had this problem with the powder (setting type) when painting with a roller. It is more work mixing it and cleaning it up completely in a timely manner, but it goes on much easier and smoother than the stuff you get in a bucket. I use the 45 minute stuff, but being inexperienced you may want the 90 minute type. It is also much more difficult to sand, but I rarely need to do anything more than a quick swipe or 2 to clean it up.
Mike D.
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Mike Dobony wrote:

Damp sponge the edges.

Use Easy Sand instead of Durabond.
R
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