Mower lost air filter won't start.

Page 2 of 2  


That dangling wire is likely your kill switch. You can remove the blower housing easily enough and get a look at the ignition coil. That wire ought to plug into a little tab on the side of the coil. If you're missing the deadman brake assembly & control entirely, you can remove that kill wire to avoid accidental shutdowns, but then you'll have to kill the engine by shorting out the sparkplug with a screwdriver. You could bolt a little strip of sheetmetal on top of the engine's head so when you want to stop it you can step on it to push it into contact with the plug. Not pretty, but works. Don';t use your bare hands to do it though! (: If you want to repair it properly, look at your flywheel brake mechanism. You should notice a small wedge on the side of the brake lever that will contact a little piece of metal when the brake applies and will move out of contact. The bit of metal that's being contacted should be mounted in a little chunk of plastic. Thread the wire's end into that bit of metal and make sure it isn't touching anything beyond that plastic insulating block. It should actually have a little clip to hold the wide for you. Everywhere else secure the wire so it won't get tugged on by anything or pulled into the flywheel.

Does your carb have a choke or primer bulb? Should it? And are you using it? Some engines will have the primer bulb integrated into the air filter housing, so if that's gone, so is your primer. If that's the case then your carb's flange where the filter should bolt will have a little pinhole on the side. Either get your hands on a filter mount or rig up a choke plate that can cover up about 3/4 of the intake's cross-section. The filter is required since even a little bit of grit in the engine will work it's way into the oil and lap all of your bearings to death. If you haven't already, it's a very good idea to change your oil. Avoid using starting fluid to restart the engine when it's hot. The stuff evaporates so fast it'll cool down whatever it lands on and stress it. I've seen a valve cracked off from that. A little squirt of gas should work fine to start up without the danger.

I think you're talking about the little square shaft poking out the top with the one-way clutch in it. Your flywheel bearing is actually the bearing in the engine block towards the flywheel side. If that is seizing up, scrap the mower. But if it's just the starter on top of the flywheel, you can fix it. The square shaft is held in place by a flat metal disc which you can pry off easily once you get everything out of the way. Do this with the shaft pointed up because if you do it sideways for whatever reason you'll lose the balls when they fall out. It should be cleaned out completely--not a trace of rust or old grease anywhere. Use emery cloth on the inside of the square shaft and the round shaft it rides on. Then oil it with light oil--not grease. There is probably a small spongy pad up inside. If it is, put a few drops of oil on it. Engine oil is OK, but you might have to pull it apart again next year. The balls and all surfaces they contact should be clean and dry with no oil. Also check the reel and cover to see if it's been mashed down any. If it has it can also cause the bearing to seize and squeal. If you need to replace it, remove the spark plug and stuff a length of rope into the cylinder. Leave the end hanging out so you can pull it out later. Rotate the engine backward until it stops due to the rope. Now take some big-assed vise grips, channel-lock pliers, or whatever and twist the cup (not the shaft!) backwards and it should screw off. You can also use a hammer and punch on one side to break it loose. Take out the rope. The new one just screws on hand-tight. It'll get nice and snug the first time you pull the cord.
--
B.B. --I am not a goat! thegoat4 at airmail dot net
http://web2.airmail.net/thegoat4 /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim Zimmerman wrote:

Does the wire lead to a box that says "Series 4" or similar? That's the kill for the deadman, When the deadman bar is released it grounds out the coil as well as applys a brake to the flywheel.

Probably gummed carb. Pull the carb off the gas tank and check if the intake tubes are plugged. I may have an old filter box in my pile of junk that you can have for the shipping charge if interested.

Once that starts seizing up it has to be replaced. The ratchet balls eventually wear grooves in the housing and bind up the works. It's about $15 and you need a special tool P/N 19244. All ya do is take off the cowling, remove and ground the spark plug wire, block the blade then unscrew it using the special tool. Installation is reverse but ya torque the clutch to 55 ft.lbs.
Nate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Stormin Mormon," writes

"B.B.," writes

"Nate Weber" bungara snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes

<snip>
Hi, Everyone's been helpful. The mower now works. From advices I manage to find where the wire broke off from. I then plug it back into into the spot where the wire broke off which is inside a box that says"Series 4" or similar. I can now push the mower up and down the driveway without stalling. The gas is dump for the third time.
The shaft with the one-way clutch opens as said. I find a little grease but no structural damages. I wipe the grease and apply a bit of synthetic ATF and it works great. Thanks for tips.
The mower doesn't have a primer bulb or need ether to start but it won't start on its first attempt, which is great. I have managed to find a used air box (without a primer button) that I will try to fit in, but if it doesn't work out, which it will work out, I hope Nate will still come thru with his offer.:-)
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.