More pics of my neighbor's roof

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Whether wet or frosted the area in question is cooler than the rest of the roof. When this section gets cooler than the dewpoint then either dew or frost will form. The majority of the roof usually never gets cold enough for frost or dew to form because the majority of the roof is warmed by the escaping heat from the house.
The area in question does no receive as much escaping heat as the majority of the roof. This small section is insulated or sealed from the rest of the house better than the majority of the roof.
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m35603 wrote:

Yes, that is what happens. I suggest you take a course in what happens to roofs by looking around at your neighborhood roofs after it snows and as the snow disappears and after frosty nights; note the aspect (direction of the roof slope). You might want to note whether there is or is not frost or condensed water on the windshields of cars pointed north. Note that water can't pass through windshields, so whether is water or frost on the outside windshield surface has nothing to do with ventilation in the car.
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We had a moderate frost here this morning and I looked at a lot of roofs on the way to work. Nearly every one had a frost pattern similar to the pictures. There may well be problems with the neighbor's roof, but the frost neither proves nor disproves anything. The roof-- and the house itself-- don't look that old, so my guess is that this is much ado about nothing. Larry
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|I posted a question last week or so about my neighbor's roof having a | wet spot on it. Two days ago, I took a few more pictures. It was below | feezing overnight and at 7:30 am the neighbor's roof looked like this: | |
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q76/m35603/HPIM1605.jpg |
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q76/m35603/HPIM1604.jpg |
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q76/m35603/HPIM1603.jpg |
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q76/m35603/HPIM1602.jpg | | What do y'all think? | | The main suggestion under the other post were that it is caused by a | possible ventilation problem. The bathroom that is right there where | this spot is. | | Thanks so much for everybody's input! | Angie |
first of all this house is a hip roof that has no ventilation on the hips therefore the middle vented area takes longer to defrost.
2nd this area is over a bathroom that may have poor insulation in the roof allowing moisture to escape and causing condensation to freeze on the roof.
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"m35603" wrote in message

Without an actual inspection, one can only go by the pictures you posted of just one side of the roof.
Initial observations are: Two power vents located on other areas of the structure, which don't come on during winter. I see no other forms of hip/ridge ventilation, and no other pod type vents. The bathroom soil stacks are noted, but no vents for exhaust fans in area (In my area, codes prohibit routing fans directly to attic area, and to soffit areas.)
Just some thoughts. Since it's a cathedral ceiling, the insulation is packed in cavity, keeping very well insulated, allowing the frost to remain on roof in this area, vs more heat loss in other areas.
It looks wet when no other areas are, probably because it is. It could be improper installation of insulation (no baffles) and/or lack of proper deck venting, and/or lack of proper routing of bathroom venting to the exterior.
Also noted is what appears to be buckling of shingles (curls) in this area, indicating lack of proper ventilation.
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m35603 wrote:

Hi, How about go upto the roof and down in the attic and look? Is it such a chore?
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