Mold/mildew in shower

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wrote:

It sounds odd, but I get the best caulk results by using a battery-powered caulking gun. Application is very smooth and it stops immediately when you release the trigger. It's both faster and neater than a manual gun, and pros in this area are starting to use the same thing. Mine is an inexpensive Ryobi gun from HD, uses 18v batteries that also power some of my other Ryobi cordless tools. I don't think much of most of the 18v Ryobi stuff, but this one is a winner.
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wrote:

I bought the Ryobi 18v drill mainly of pretty good ratings from Consumer Reports and have been happy with it. What don't you like about it?
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[snip]

Battery life -- both in terms of operating hours and how quickly they lose their charge when not in use. I "splurged" on a Ridgid 18V set (drill, recip saw, circular saw, flashlight) and discovered a major difference. The Ridgid always seems to be charged up, even if I haven't used it for a month or more, when the Ryobi would be flat. Plus I get a lifetime warranty and free replacement on the Ridgid batteries. The Ridgid is noticeably heavier -- not necessarily a good thing, but seems well balanced and the circular saw does everything I ask of it.
I also had a Craftsman 18V kit, and found the batteries didn't last long, were expensive to replace, and that Craftsman had more than one style of 18V battery -- the replacement style I needed never seemed to be in stock.
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KLS wrote:

Painter's tape works for me. There is no need to try to fill space in or behind the wall. Caulk is to bridge the gap and seal it off. If you are new to caulking, you might want to practice. I cut the tip so it is open perhaps 1/8". You want the finished caulk bead to be - in cross section - like a cove molding.....smoothe and concave so it doesn't trap water or soap scum. Put down your painters tape so it is perfectly straight and so that the outside of the caulk tip rides right on the edges of the tape - then when you push the caulk gun forward, slowly, the tip of the tube forms the "cove" and extra is pushed onto the tape. I've redone caulking when I wasn't pleased the first time. Nothing better than spit on yer finger for smoothing it :o) Keep damp rags handy.
Vital to have the surfaces perfectly clean of grease and soap scum, and a wipe with full-strength bleach before putting on the caulk.
I made the mistake of filling in a gap with caulk once and ended up with water and caulk running down the outside of the tub/shower enclosure. More is not always better. If the gap between wall and tub is greater than 1/4", you need to get backer rod (foam) to fill the space behind the caulk.
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