Moisture coming out of window air conditioner's vents

We have a window air conditioning unit in one of our windows. It is mounted tilting downward, which is supposed to ensure that the moisture produced by the cooling process flows out the back of the unit. However, since we got this unit about a year and a half ago (it's out of warranty), and it's doing it again now that we've turned it on for a few hours, the moisture just pours out of the vents.
When you look inside the vents from the inside, you see a styrofoam area with an opening in the middle where you can see the fan in the air conditioning unit. Looking at the unit from the back, from outside, the styrofoam part is closed off from the working parts of the air conditioning unit and the back grille.
When the unit is operating, you can sit there and see an enormous amount of water pool up inside the grilles around the styrofoam area, I mean an enormous amount. It doesn't appear to have any outlet to run back to the back of the unit, it certainly doesn't appear to be running down into the opening to the fan area. It just pools up and blows out the vent grilles. You can literally hear the thing sloshing.
We have tried everything and it's impossible to mount this unit tilted any more downward at the back ... you can see the downward slant in the styrofoam area ... but it continues to blow water out of the grille to where we have to keep towels on the floor in front of it. I've even thought of punching holes in the styrofoam to see if that might help the water stop pooling up in the area around the vents.
Does anyone know what might be going on here, or have any suggestions for what we might could do to fix this. It's a great air conditioning unit as far as cooling the small area we use it for, but we're getting tired of having to clean up water from it.
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If you are sure that it is tilted to drain out, you must have a blocked passage that leads to the out side. Remove the outside cover and clean it out.
Hank
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It is normal for the water to pool up inside the unit. This is part of the operation. It does not need to drain. It should say in your manual it is normal.
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In some units the water collects to wet the condenser coil and improve efficency of the unit. There is a valve on these types that opens if too much water is collected. This valve may be clogged with dirt or otherwise defective.
Jimmie
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It is NOT normal for moisture to "pour" out the vents. I don't think the manual will say that it is. Show me.
Hank
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It's often easier to find and clear the drain by removing the cover. Take the AC out of the window, carry it outdoors. Take the plastic decorative plate off, and remove about 20 screws, that hold the metal cover (and accordian sides). With the main metal cover, it's much easier to find the drain.
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Is it super humid out, maybe its low on freon
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If it's making water it sure has Freon. Your comment indicates you don't know much about refrigeration. The moisture being produced needs a path to allow excess water to get to the bottom tray/pan. Something is blocked.
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Do not poke any holes in the foam.
I'd put money on a clogged drain. Most units have a sheet metal wrapper around them. The workings are mounted on a steel plate that is the chassis and the cover is held on with a bunch of screws. Unless you can see in from the side you will have to remove the wrapper, find the drain tube or opening, clear it and re-assemble. Time consuming, but no special skills needed. The evaporator coil (the inside one) is probably sitting on a foam tray and the water drains to the rear either through a piece of plastic tubing or a groove in the molded piece. Dust, algae, leaves, or whatever could be blocking it.
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PRW wrote:

There if often SOME water. The machine slings the condensate against the condensing coil to further cool it, thereby gaining efficiency. There should, I would think, be an overflow drain so that all the humidity removed from your room doesn't flood back in.
I suspect a clogged overflow drain.
See if you can find an exploded drawing of the unit on the web.
I'm also suspicious of the hunk of styrofoam. Are you sure its not part of the original packing material? That is, does it come out?
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HeyBub wrote: snipped

Perhaps the OP can find the installation manual.
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The OP is describing water coming into the house. Sounds like a clogged drain, and sounds like the styrofoam is part of the intended design.
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The fan housings, scroll plates and drain pans are often made of molded foam. Trust, me, our company made hundreds of thousands of them, some gray, some white. .
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At the back of the evaporator housing , there is a small drain channel which may have gotton blocked with debris over the years. Further, the evaporator fins may be quite dirty where the condensate wont trickle down the fins by gravity too well and instead is being blown off into the room. Finally, I would take the a/c unit outside, unscrew the chassis and remove it, then thoroughly wash the inside of the a/c with spray detergent folllowed by water from a hose . Take care not to spray the electrical directly, and, dry down the unit before restarting it. While its opened up, spray a good amount of water thru the fins of the evaporator and condensor from both sides. If there is a place to oil the evaporator and condensor fan motors, then put 5 drops into each oil spout/bearing hole located on the ends of the motor. Reinstall the a/c tilting it outward by at least a 1/4" from level. Good luck.
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understand that the water runs off the inside coil down into a tray or just the bottom of the unit. From there it MUST find its way through the unit into the outside section. Many (most?) units have a slinger on the outside fan that throws the water on the outside coil. This evaporates the water and cools the coil. Some units only have a drain for the water and I think most have at least an overflow drain.
The water passage from inside to outside is very small and often gets clogged. Sometimes it is only a slot under the bulkhead. If you make a big hole it will pass a lot of air as well as the water. Just figure out where the proper passage is and clean it out. It does not take a lot of slope on the unit; at least some manufacturers suggest a level installation.
Don Young
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