Modular Homes - A waste of wood

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It would appear the OP has become convinced that 'modular' homes are not built well?
There is one in our area that was delivered in two sections some 25+ years ago from its factory some 500 miles away. It looks completely normal and apart from an approximately eight inch thick middle wall appeared to be built to normal Canadian housing standards for a 'stick' home. It has served its original and present owners without any problems or sagging etc. It took less than a day to place it on its previously poured concrete basement and no damage occurred. Within a few days the electricity water and sewer was hooked up and people were living in it.
I happened to visit the factory on other business and saw nothing that was below standard or seemed to use excessive wood! Just ordinary houses built all year round, each in two pieces etc. inside a big dry ex-aircraft hangar.
I would emphasize this is a 'factory built home' not a factory built sometimes called tow able or flat bed transportable 'mobile' home; some of which are of the flimsy (per the reference to entry with a box cutter utility knife!) construction akin to that of a cheap camper!
As people have built and bought more elaborate homes in recent years the 'factory builts' never seemed to catch on in this province. Also at that time period (1970s) I guess so many of us were willing and capable with the help of a couple of local carpenters to 'build our own'. We did twice (including wells and septic tanks) sticking with single storey construction. And even now in my 70s I can maintain most of it with just a step ladder.
Stick with simple construction; avoiding things such as roof dormers, bay windows. Avoid if possible roof gutters by using a larger overhang to get water away from footings, gutters cause rot in soffit edge board. Make sure you have good drainage 'before' you pour (or concrete block build your basement) Weeping tile and a sump essential most places.
But IMO there is nothing wrong with modular construction. Many were built to slightly more economical standards (e;g. slightly lower ceilings to reduce heating cost) and were shipped to northern communities. Also some 'design' modular homes have been built and shipped from Canada to places such as Iceland, Denmark etc.
Personally have found that wood frame (either 2 by 4 or now more commonly 2 by 6) homes are easy to build; easy to modify and maintain, can be well insulated and stand up well in this cold windy climate. Wood frame, with very occasionally some brick veneer, is the commonest building method here. In our capital city and larger towns there many traditionally built several storey wooden homes which are well over 100 years old. Most of them need ladders and safety ropes/slings to work on their roofs and chimneys etc. We also have some flat roofed two storey homes; some of which were built abutting each other quickly after a major fire around 1895? Still in use but much modified many were built with raw stick flattened on two sides to for nailing to. Some boards are well over a foot wide; don't see lumber like that these days in this norther climate.
Good luck.
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Looks to me like he is exagerating grossly the installer. Any purchaser that accepted that disaster would be out of his mind.
As to the description of the constructions standards of that one house he supposedly looked at - that builder would be out of business by the time he sold only a few.
Harry K
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