Mix 15A and 20A receptacles on a circuit

Is it OK to mix 15A and 20A receptacles on a 20A circuit?
Suppose I put a 20A GFCI as the first receptacle, and put 10 15A non-GFCI receptacle downstream, protected by the 1st 20A GFCI, will GFCI will be effective?
What about we put 1st as 15A GFCI, followed by a mix of 20A and 15A receptacles protected by 1st GFCI. Will that cause problems?
Are they code vilation?
My builder put 1st receptacle as 15A GFCI, protecting a few non GFCI 15A downstream in the kitchen, in several of 20A circuits. So using 15A all the way through a 20A circuit is OK, I suppose.
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W G wrote:

Yes (at least it's OK in USA, I dunno about Canada.) You are not supposed to put 20A receptacles on a 15A circuit, but 15A on a 20A circuit is OK.

Yes.
If you check the label, the 15A GFCI probably has a 20A feed-thru rating.
Best regards, Bob
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Hopefully it is a 20a circuit, or you would not be asking this question, right?! Then, yes, you mix and match. However, unless you have a really good reason for doing so, don't bother with a 20a GFCI. They are more expensive, and you are unlikely to find anything to plug into them.
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reason
Electrician told me the code now requires use of 20 amp GFCI. He also told me it's ok to mix and match 15 and 20 amp outlets on a 20 amp breaker. Since the 2nd outlet has current supplied by the copper pieces on the side of the previous outlet, I'm assuming the through current rating of a 15 amp outlet is 20 amps. Is this correct? Or should each individual 15 amp outlet have pigtails from the supply line that go only to that outlet? For the small difference in price of only $1.39 each, why skimp on 15 amp outlets on a $500 job?
Bob
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It is possible that your local code does require a 20a GFCI. There is no need to pigtail, though some people think it is a better way to run circuits in general; yes, outlets are through 20a even if they are 15a. (The pigtails obviously have to be 12 gauge) I "believe" there is no difference between a 15a outlet and a 20a except the slot direction. It is purely to prevent you from plugging a 20a device into a 15a circuit. I haven't bought a 20a GFCI in over a year, maybe they have come down in price; there is certainly no harm in using 20a outlets. It is just unusual to see a 20a plug. (I have one on my 2hp table saw, but thats about it.)
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Call the AHJ in your area and ask them. Builders will do anything that they can get away with that costs less, GUARANTEED.
ahj= authority having jurisdiction
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With the exception of a window air conditioner, is there any reason you need 20A outlets in a home? I have never seen a need for them using any home appliances. The only other exception would be if you have a home woodworking shop. I only use #12 wire, on all outlets, so I can always change the outlet and breaker, but I have never seen the need. I only use #14 wire on lights, and often use #12 there too. Just depends on what I have on hand. I always use a 15A breaker on lights too.

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Code requires that, on a single-outlet 20a circuit, the receptacle be rated 20a. IF you have a 20a circuit with MORE than one outlet, you may NOT use a 20a rated outlet in configuration, but may instead use 15a rated devices.
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