Metal Halide Arc bulbs for home? Crazy?

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Alot of buildings Might use them maybe HD lowes menards etc, go ask what they use and see how bright it is, pointed up it may be ok, but bright im sure there are UV lenses available or built in now as standard in interior fixtures
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@NOSPAM.4324.invalid says...

You certainly can, they're excellent for indirect lighting applications, use them in a fixture that throws the light up at the ceiling for very diffuse, low-glare lighting. I used to have a 400W halide fixture for my cathedral-ceiling living room -- a huge, dramatic wall sconce at one end lit the whole room with light bounced off the wall and ceiling.
I worked for a time in an architect's office that had 240W halides throughout, bounced up off the high ceiling, it was beautiful lighting for that work, almost no distinct shadow when your hand moved over a drawing, since there was light coming at it from all angles.
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Thanks, that's great info. Just what is involved in having a "MH system"?
i

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You need the right fixture, and a Metal halide ballast, and cooling for both.
Metal Halide bulbs are used quite often for horticulture, so check in the indoor growing area. 175 and 250 watt would be more common, as they throw a LOT of light, and a 400 watter would light up a warehouse.
For example, the local box store has the smaller bulbs on the shelf.
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That is way too expensive. They sell the bulbs in HD for around $25. I collect light bulbs and can tell you that its too expensive. You will need a ballast though.
There is no danger from UV if the glass outer shell is intact.
There IS a danger from explosion, and those bulbs must be encased in a fixture that can contain them. Occasionally the bigger ones (1500W) will pop at a stadium and you can hear them go from across the field. The quartz in them is red hot. But I think they only blow when they get near the end of their life time.
The 400W is the cheapest of the lot. The smaller ones are more expensive, as are the larger ones, as 400W is the most common.
You can also buy them at www.lightbulbdepot.com and www.topbulb.com, etc.
Dean
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Thanks Dean.
So, you would say that to have MH lighting, I need a
- Ballast/relay system. - A proper fixture (different from rregular fixtures) - The bulbs themselves
Is that correct?
i
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Here:
http://www.topbulb.com/find/Product_Description.asp_Q_intProductID_E_45442
$19 each.
Dean
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One more downside to MH is that once you turn it off, you have to wait for it to cool down before it will re-start. And they take a minute or so to warm up, so its not for a room in a house.
I like them for a workshop though - plenty of light and little heat (compared to tungsten bulbs).
Dean
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Thanks, that's great. I am looking to buy them at about $4 apiece, NOS. I will check out prices of fixtures and other items. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
i
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$4 each? Good luck with that!
Cheapest bet would be a cheap fuxture from HD, you can butcher the thing if you have to, or just use it as it is.
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Hm, a "fuxture" sounds like some sexy bedroom toy. :)
Seriously, thank you very much, I am going to read up on that. I suppose that these fixtures provide adequate fire protection.
i scratcing his fuxture
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Ignoramus4324 wrote:

Might want to ask in sci.engr.lighting
Here's a picture of my 1500 MH yard light. It turns night into day.
http://members.cox.net/michaelshaffer/mhlamp.jpg
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Michael - nice! I have the same bulb, but on a fixture I made. It does indeed turn night into day!
Moths love it though. Thing gets covered in fried insects after a few days!
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dean wrote:

Yea, before I got the fixture the bulb was getting coated in moth guts. It did light up the trees a lot better though.
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That one has a glass plate then? I can't see it (its too clean!)
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dean wrote:

Yup, I think it's plastic, not sure though.
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Uv filters are nearly clear to the eye and might lower output less than 1%, but are probably part of the bulbs glass.
If you have 8, 4 ft 40 watt flourescent now and are not happy then you might be fine, if you upshoot the light, you will likely only triple output. Flourescent are not more efficient as someone stated. But go by lumen output, figure out what your tubes are and you decide if you can handle it. There is a temp -time rating for startup so look into that as well.
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