Major Screwup by Gas Company - House Explodes

Page 2 of 2  
wrote:

I think one basement room filled with gas would be enough. How long it takes to fill a room to that degree I don't know, but apparently it is no more than the time from the "POP" to the explosion.
When the air force bombs a building, they don't have to set of little bombs throughout the building. A bomb that explodes in one room will do.
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CKI wrote:

This is still preliminary, but apparently they heard a bang, smelled gas, and the son came outside. The explosion occured almost immediately after this, I think the timeline was very very short. I think the mother was already outside raking leaves, nobody else was home. They are lucky it happen in the daytime, there were no serious injuries.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I lived just a few towns away from the town where this happened, the gas company had a slogan "Go modern, go gas". We already had gas heat, hot water, cooking etc. The house two doors away blew up. The slogan became " Go gas, go modern, go boom".
Charlie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Really a freak accident. I would guess your chance of being injured by a gas explosion (assuming you are following code) is about equal to the added chance of fire or electrocution due to a malfunction of your heat pump. Both are very remote. You have a far better chance of winning the lottery.
If you like explosions, a little research will find a number of situations where gasoline has contaminated sewer lines and blown up areas of towns.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My neighbors lawn mower caught fire, gee maybe I should get a goat instead.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Nov 2005 08:22:41 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

Don't get an electric goat.
Unless you get a GFI.
Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let me know if you have posted also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Nov 2005 12:40:56 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

In 1984, I was operating a service station I leased from the oil company. They owned the building, the tanks and the gas in them. I paid for gas through the pumps.
At that time (maybe still) the state required pressure testing of the tanks at regular intervals. This time the tank failed. Before they could release the pressure, 700 gallons of gas seeped into a 4 foot storm drain 30 feet away. It dumped into a creek a half mile away through a residential neighborhood. Major cleanup; major evacuation.
Contaminated soil was hauled away in sealed drums at $455 each. Excavation equipment without electrical systems was used to dig the soil out and later at the evaporation site to turn the soil daily. They were started with APU carts at least 200 feet away. Operators wore hazmat suits and respirators.
There is now a car wash on that site. Behind it is a 36" ventilation well with a suction fan on a 25' stack. I'm told the air/fuel mixture coming out is still combustible twenty-one years later
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy Asberry wrote:

Yikes! I assume the tanks were underground, where did the leak occur? How did it get to the storm drain, or did not just migrate from the tank directly to the storm drain well? Was it leaded gas?

I'll bet it is! There are a few gas stations in my town that have histories of leaking tanks many years ago, and are still being remediated today. One leaked while it was a Chevron station, I don't even recall Chevron ever being in this part of the country (Massachusetts). The environmental engineers were able to track which plume was which by looking at what additives were in each brand of gasoline.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.