Low-friction track for sliding 60lb box about 3 feet.

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I've got to figure out an easy way to slide a box/enclosure weighing about 60lbs. Got to move about 3 feet, and the box itself is about 3feet long, so I'd need at least 6feet of track. I was thinking about sliders that they use for glass doors, but I'm not sure if there are mounting constraints or if they'll support the weight. And I'd need to find a vendor. Ideas?
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If the box is flat on the bottom, get some PVC pipe and cut it into 4 or 5 pieces and put under the box to roll it. When the first piece comes out the back, move it back to the front. If it is not flat, you may be able to put a board under it to make it flat. If it is only 60 lb, looks like you could get another to help just carry it.
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On Sat, 10 Apr 2010 23:53:36 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

Thanks for your reply, Ralph. I should have explained this better. It's a repetitive thing--gotta keep sliding it between two spots about 3 feet apart. And it's in kind of an awkward place to get any muscle into it (or keep moving PVC rollers). Can only get to one end of it. So I've just been pushing/pulling it across a couple 2x4's, but that's no fun. <g>
I've got sliders that are used for mounting gear in electronic racks, but they only have about 2 feet travel, max. That's why I was wondering if there are glass door slides or something similar, and who would sell those. Not sure if that's a home depot item.
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What's wrong with casters?
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

This sounds familiar- did you ask this same question a month or three ago?
What is floor covered with? If other than shag carpet, those furniture moving glide things would work. Harbor Freight is probably cheapest source, but they sell them damn near everywhere. Does this need to be pretty? Does box need to sit directly on floor? HF also has a good selection of industrial casters, including ones with parking brakes. Not 48 hours ago, I moved several computer room racks of several hundred pounds each, on very frail-looking casters, quite easily. I did have to screw the leveling legs up out of the way so the casters would not hang up on floor seams, but they rolled and steered quite easily, once I pulled the chocks out.
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wrote:

Nope. Do you happen to remember the thread title? Any promising suggestions?

It's outdoor. No carpet.

No.
It's on a couple 2x4's now, serving as temporary 'rails' but that's pretty high friction.

That's another thought. I would have to make a flat base for the thing to roll on. I was thinking 'rails' or straight track simply cause I usually have to keep it on a straight line, but I'll think about the casters. Thanks for the suggestions!
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Theh make sets of four**, to go under each corner of a refrigerator. **I don't four what. If each one has one wheel or more. Maybe just one. They're supposed to stay in place somehow. Maybe little teeth. An inch high or so, iirc.
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Get a couple of pillow-blocks for each end and mount pulliys on the end of axles - roll the pulleys on peices of angle iron on the ground like ^.
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aemeijers wrote:

Another thought- does the box have to stay completely level? Can you just screw cleats or feet on the bottom, and use a good-quality 2-wheel hand truck (the kind with blow-up tires, not the crap fold-up kind), to pick up the box and roll it? With most 'real' hand trucks, the lever action would be plenty to get it off the ground slightly, albeit at a 10 degree angle, and let you roll it back the three feet painlessly. If you are worried about it falling off the cart, a short rope or one of those ratcheting tie-down straps would easily secure it. About like moving a small file cabinet.
I bought a cheap industrial hand truck like that 2 moves and 18 years ago. Best 30-buck tool investment I have ever made. I may only use it 5-6 times a year, but it has saved my butt, and my back, many times. They used to be hard to find, but now pretty much any place that sells tools has them. For what you need, the Harbor Freight one is probably cheapest, and more than adequate.
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On Sat, 10 Apr 2010 23:53:36 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

Get some of those "EZ Sliders" they advertize on late-night TV. They'l move 200 lbs with no problem, Just big teflon or something coated pads that you slip under the load - slide on carpet, tile, hardwood etc but not much good on rough concrete.
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VM wrote:

Hmmm, Can't get a helper? 60 lbs is not that heavy. Even one can pretty well lift it at one end and pullit or push.
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wrote:

I don't have much problem moving it, but I already mentioned that it's just push or pull. No access to lift it. Just looking to make things a bit easier.
I think there was a Tony Hwang on one of the guitar groups a while ago. Don't suppose that's you?
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VM wrote:

If the floor is wood or concrete, it would be quite easy to do. I would take some angle iron or aluminum and attach parallel strips to the floor to guide standard rubber or polyurethane casters. If you don't use swivel casters, you would only need one track on one side to guide those wheels. You could also use metal U channel but the mounting holes would need to be counter- sunk to keep the screws flush unless you used a stiff enough metal channel that only needed to be anchored at each end.
http://www.castercity.com/products.htm
TDD
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On Sun, 11 Apr 2010 02:16:12 -0500, The Daring Dufas

That brings up another good point. At the moment, the 2x4's are the only support...it's outside, and not on completely level surface. If I go with casters, I was thinking about putting plywood under it, but of course weather is a problem. Short of pouring concrete (can't be done there), is there some material that would be available in sheet form that would support a reasonable amount of weight, while surviving the weather?
Thanks for your other comments, DD.
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VM wrote:

Well heck, just use some steel U channel for support and guide rails. It could be welded to some angle iron on the bottom for more strength but for the short lengths, the U channel may be enough.
TDD
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wrote:

I'm 76 and now have trouble dead lifting that kind of weight, alone, even if can get hold of it. Sixty pounds is not that heavy though. I have a an ex WWII radio that weighs more than that! But no longer move it alone. BTW; 5'-10" and weigh 190lbs. dry, and have a slight heart condition. But do routinely move items that weight (fridge, washer, dryer etc. using a slightly tipped two wheel trolley). If you haven't got one, and IMO every home should have, hung on wall somewhere, a new two wheel simple 'hand trolley' as used by delivery people, costs around $30 and will have lots of other uses! Best if it has inflatable tyres kept at good pressure of around 60 to 80 psi. Used our trolley a few minutes ago to move a burning barrel half full of ashes; before lighting it again.
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terry wrote:

I used to impress this gal I knew, she was 5-11 and 230lbs. I would throw her over my shoulder and carry her around. *snicker*
TDD
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http://www.crlaurence.com / major supplier to the glass working industry. You may need to buy through a local customer of theirs.
I do think that a chunk of ball roller conveyor or table would be better: http://www.ashlandconveyor.com /
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Those look very cool! Closer to what I had in mind. Now if they're affordable...
Thanks for the link, Dan.
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If you have someone who caters to used store fixturing in your area, you may be able to come up with a worn, bent, or otherwise usable chunk. These things are common where trucks are unloaded.
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