Long waits for hot water - what are my options

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We can wait for up to 5 minutes to get hot water to our sinks and showers.
It seems there are lots of different options to help this.
Are there any preferred methods?
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theedudenator wrote:

Remove any flow restrictors. Run water full to get heat, then turn it down to conserve.
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We do run it at full to get heat, it still takes minutes.

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Did you remove restrictors? How big and long are the pipes?
You could add a recirculation pump.
theedudenator wrote:

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The pipes are mostly 3/4 dia copper I am not seeing any restrictions except for some inline ball valves.
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On Tue, 14 Apr 2009 22:53:35 -0700 (PDT), theedudenator

    You would do far better with smaller pipes. In order to get hot water to your fixture, you have to run all the cold water in the pipe before you get any hot. A 3/4" pipe holds a lot of cold water. You don't need 3/4" pipe to supply any single outlet. You are also wasting heat, especially in the summer.
    Other choices include any of several re circulation pumps or you could try a point source heater. It may be a good use for a small thankless water heater.
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theedudenator wrote:

Restrictors are often washer like things on the aerator or shower head that restrict the water flow. Removing them allows water to replace that in the pipe faster. Turning on multiple faucets to get hot water faster may help. 3/4" pipe for hot water is probably your problem. 1/2" probably holds half the water, and thus, hot water would get there twice as fast.
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wrote:

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There are recirculating pumps that will keep the hot water in the line. They can be set to run only at certain hours when you're likely to need hot water. Check out the Taco web site for information.
You can add a second water heater closer tot he point of use.
It may be smart to downsize the line size if they are 3/4" and you don't need it
If you have a low flow shower heat, turn the hot water faucet in the sink on to move out the cold water faster.
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what kind of tank, fuel source how long of run from tank to fixtures?
need more info to help
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How about a few more details...
distance from point of use to water heater hot water pipe size & material flow capacity at "full on" of shower & sink
I had a house where it took ~120+ secs to get water to the farthest bathroom....1960's galvanized steel pipe: 3/4" & 1/2" in the hot water run
The pipes were so old & filled with hard water deposits that a 2' section would not pass light..........
I used to turn on the hot water & go do something until the hot water arrived.
I would suggest a
http://www.chilipepperapp.com/howit.htm
on a timer (if possible) or a demand switch (normal operating mode)
I sold the house & moved before I dealt with the problem.
cheers Bob
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I don't have exact measurements 2,000 sqft house gas hot water heater in basement 3/4dia copper pipes up to second floor bath room Water pressure is not good upstairs Weld pump is 40-60psi

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I looked at http://www.chilipepperapp.com This is probably something I want to do upstairs. But I don't understand how the hot water will go back through the cool lines to my hot water heater. Won't this just fill my cold water lines with luke warm water?
I like the X-10 system also, something I already have in my house.
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Yes, and that's one of the downsides to these pumps. They use the existing cold water line to send the water back into the system. Whcih means if you use it in say an upstairs bedroom bathroom, and you want a drink of cold water, you may wind up with tepid water unless you let it run for long enough first. Or if it's a kitchen, you could draw cold water to make coffee and get water that's been in the hot water tank instead of fresh water. It's something you should be aware of upfront. You could install a recirculating pump system with a seperate return line, but of course how easy that is depends on access to route the new pipe.
Regarding reducing the piping from 3/4 to 1/2, I probably wouldn't do that. They use 3/4 for a reason, which is it can maintain a higher pressure at the endpoint while drawing more water volume. If you have two bathrooms, that is important. If you are considering doing that, first measure how much water is drawn before it warms up. Then do the math to figure out how much difference reducing the pipe diameter will make.

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On Apr 15, 8:23am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I don't think I would have a drinking water problem. We have a separate and direct water filter for all drinking water. I have a direct 3/4" copper line from the hot water heater to the 2nd floor bathroom. There is nothing else connected to it. The bad thing is these would be difficult to replace. I think if I put a recirc unit on this it would solve 80% of my problems The remaining bathroom, kitchen and laundry room are all tied together with 3/4" to bathroom then 3/4" kitchen, then 1/2" to laundry. All in series. I think if I isolate and run a direct 3/4" to the laundry it will solve the downstairs issues with low pressure and long waits for hot.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I agree with trader4, do that experiment, and if the flow rate seems unreasonably low, look for a "concealed restriction". Maybe compare the hot water flow rate with the cold water one, assuming both use 3/4" pipin runs.
Often if galvanized nipples are screwed into the water heater tank inlet/outlet tappings they'll get filled nearly shut with galvanic corrosion which can greatly reduce the hot water flow rate.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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wrote:

PEX is a excellent line to replace the copper with or run as a re circulate line. low cost, easy to install and doesnt radiate heat like copper, although it should be insulated anyway
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Yes, basically correct but mostly cold water followed by water followed by a bit of hot. The chilipepper return pump will shut off when the hot water arrives at the pump.
Your 3/4" copper tube holds about 2x the volume of water that a 1/2" tube would hold. About a 1/4 gallon of water for every 10' of 3/4" tube.
So unless you have a really LONG run I dont think the problem is pipe size. Even 100' would only be 2.5 gallons of cold water to waste, even at low flow shower head rates that would only be a minute or so.
Something else must be going on........5 minutes is a long time.
I get hot water to the kitchen sink (~25 feet of 1/2" PEX) in about 15 secs.
Do an experiment to see how much cold water is really dumped......
With only the hot valve turned on collect the "cold" water from the shower in a 5 gallon bucket to see how much water is used before the hot water arrives. Time the process accurately as well.
cheers Bob

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theedudenator wrote:

the hot water does not go back through the cold line. It shuts off when the hot water gets to it.
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I guess I should ask what is the optimal method to transfer hot water. I do have low pressure issues so I am not sure if reducing pipe size will fix my upstairs issue. But I think by running direct lines to my kitchen and laundry room will help
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