Long bolt: make my own?

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woger151 wrote:

If you glue the nut on, use red or green "Loctite" instead of super glue. (Blue and purple are removable, red and green are permanent; green is hard to find.)
You might have better luck finding an extra-long carriage bolt instead of a hex bolt, and the round head will give a more finished look.
Bob
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Instead of 'super glue', try epoxy. You can get it inside the threads under the nut AND get a big enough glob on the end that you could smooth it out and even paint it to match the woodwork.
After hacksawing your threaded rod, look carefully at the thread where you cut. You may need to file it slightly to present an 'entry' for the nut.
Other option: you could embed the threaded rod inside the wooden post, if you envision this more or less as permanent. Drill a couple inches deep and epoxy it there.
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On Jun 1, 12:31pm, snipped-for-privacy@triton.net wrote:

re: "After hacksawing your threaded rod, look carefully at the thread where you cut. You may need to file it slightly to present an 'entry' for the nut. "
or, as I mentioned earlier, put a nut on the rod *before* cutting and use the nut to smooth out the threads by unscrewing it over the damaged threads.
Of course, in this case, you might as well leave the end damaged to make it even harder to get the nut off.
Put the nut on, cut the rod, smear your epoxy on the cut-end threads and unscrew the nut until jams on the damaged threads.
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for the nut. "

damaged threads.
A few years ago I did a project where I ended up cutting a LOT of the "all thread."
I handy accessory is a thread cutting die the corresponds to the thread. Before you cut, you thread on the die and put it on the "long side" of the cut. You might also want to thread two nuts on first so that you can jam them together and use a wrench to keep the "long side" from rotating.
When you have cut off the "short end" you remove your die from the long end. If you want to restore the entire thread of the short end you can run the die up that side.
You can set up a "production" with two dies with one, each, on the long and short sides of your cuts.
NB: It is possible to cut threads in unthreaded rod. The problem is starting the die on a poorly finished end. The result will not be any stronger than the all thread. You can do the price tradeoff's yourself.
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I always to several nuts on then cut the rod, it usually takes more than one nut to re-set the thread.
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woger151 wrote the following:

Don't let them play with wrenches. :-) Use split washers, and you can get some thread lock at an auto store.

--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Tighten the damn bolt. Even a few foot-pounds of torque, and there is no way on God's green earth a toddler can loosen it.
If you want to be paranoid about it, use aircraft nuts, also called nylon locking nuts or nylock nuts.
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woger151 wrote:

I am too. _______________

Sure. Use a hammer to peen the end of the threaded rod a bit. ______________

That will work too except put the glue on *after* you put on the nut...it will work its way down the threads.
THOUGHT FOR THE DAY There must be a lot of engineers reading this group. Seems like even dog easy stuff winds up with overly complicated solutions :)
--

dadiOH
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Use flat washers along with a lock washers..
Or 2 nuts on each end of the rod. On one end of the rod twist on both nuts so that the outer nut is flush with the end of the rod. Then using 2 wrenches tighten the outer nut while "loosening" the inner nut.
Do the same thing to the other end once you have slide it through the hole. Cut off extra rod with hacksaw.
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Just because you have problems "finding your way" using GG doesn't mean that everyone else does.
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Suggestion: If the post is hefty enough perhaps a hole/depression could be drilled into it so the nut or head of the bolt could recessed; later a peg or plug could be inserted into the hole and sanded off? If the hole is one inch deep that is one inch shorter the bolt needs to be?
Roger on ingenious toddlers. Our last used to open the 'stereo' (remember therm?) lid which I had secured with a small cabinet/desk drawer lock, using anything metallic (he must'a inherited the industrial background from somewhere!) at hand including the car keys if within reach.
Also the hole in the kitchen cabinet is still there where we used to safely padlock the cabinet with medications in it! Ah well! Today 31, he works offshore, earns twice as much as I ever did, and can fix anything from a megawatt gas turbine to an electronic thermometer! He'll be a good father too.
While he's temporarily away I'm chasing an electrical fault on his well used, third hand, 10 year old Lexus ....................... ah found it.
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Use a wood boring bit to "counter sink" the ends of the bolt (or the one you cut from the threaded rod), so little fingers can't get at them. It won't do much to impact the strength of the wood itself.
I used this approach for all the bolts on my deck structure so that bolt ends would not be visible. Works fine and takes only a few seconds to drill in far enough to hide the bolt ends.
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Several points here.
You are attaching a baby gate, not putting up a barier to protect an ingress from mongol hordes.
Through bolts are not only over kill, but they make the job way more difficult than it has to be.
A few well placed wood screws will secure the gate and after the kid is old enough to not fall down the stairs, they can be removed and the repair is going to be much easier.
Another problem you are going to have is drilling straight holes, Have you ever tried to drill a hole 8 inches deep and predict where it will come out? This is no easy task.
As far as a toddler unscrewing a nut, If a not is tightened with a wrench *you* will not be able to unscrew it by hand so a little kid would have no chance.
Another option if you really want to use nuts is to get studs. These are headless boltsthat have wood screw threads on one end and machine threads on the other. Two nuts are theaded on to the machine threads and tightened against each other locking them together. Now you drill a pilot hole and thread the stud into the wood. When the desired depth is attained, you use two wrenches and unthread the nuts.
What you end up with is a threaded shaft sticking out from the wood that can be used as an attachment point.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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I might not have described the situation completely.
The post that's there isn't directly across from the attachment point on the opposite wall. Because of the location of the handrail, I can't use one of those "angle gates". So I have to "extend" the post to get a good attachment point.
I don't actually have to do it the way I'm doing it; my original idea was to use some plywood on both sides of the old post. That way I could avoid drilling the old post. But this way is easier: The post is a little smaller than a 4x4. On the end of that I'm mounting a thin board, then a 4x4. (Need the board because the post has a wooden "cap" that prevents the 4x4 from being flush. Need the 4x4 to be taller than the cap to mount the gate hardware.)
Didn't know about the difficulty of drilling 8" straight, but fortunately won't have to deal with it. I can drill the board, the 4x4, and the post one at a time.
Cheers

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Been wondering all along. Why bolts? If the post is solid wood or even just boxed 3/4" stock, wood screws (no toddler even with tools will remove a properly applied on) or lag bolts/flat washer/lock washer does the job much simpler and is just as 'firm'. You would only have to 'operate' on the one side of the post, no through holes.
Harry K
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I don't actually have to do it the way I'm doing it; my original idea was to use some plywood on both sides of the old post. That way I could avoid drilling the old post. But this way is easier: The post is a little smaller than a 4x4. On the end of that I'm mounting a thin board, then a 4x4. (Need the board because the post has a wooden "cap" that prevents the 4x4 from being flush. Need the 4x4 to be taller than the cap to mount the gate hardware.)
Didn't know about the difficulty of drilling 8" straight, but fortunately won't have to deal with it. I can drill the board, the 4x4, and the post one at a time.
This would be even easier. Counter boar the 4X4 about 3 inches deep, and then drill a clearance hole a wee bit larger than the major diameter of the wood screw. Do this in two or three places.
Next using the holes drilled in the 4X4 as a guide, drill corresponding clearance holes in the thin board.
Now you can use the thin board as a guide to transfer the location of the three holes to the post but these holes will be pilot holes for the wood screws, so the diameter of the holes would be slightly smaller than the minor diameter of the wood screw.
Now you will have a sufficient anchor to mount the baby gate and it will be cheaper than the through bolt method and plenty secure.
Or "Plan B" would be to secure the 4X4 and the thin board to the post with large stainless steel hose clamps, (Also you could add a chunk of wood to the back side of the posts to prevent denting the wood.)and then you would have no holes to repair after you take down the baby gate.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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Loctite permanent thread locker
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[snip]
Thanks to everyone who replied. Cheers!
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Yet another alternative to Loctite/Super Glue/Welding is to use any of a variety of 'jam' nuts, e.g., http://tinyurl.com/23ddd2a
On 6/1/2010 8:46 AM, woger151 wrote:

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