Lithium batteries in flashlights?

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I bought a 12 pack of AA 1.5 volt Ultimate Energizer Lithium batteries (not the rechargeable type). The package says they last up to 8 times longer than their Energizer Max batteries in Digital cameras, and up to 7 times longer in hand held GPS devices than their Energizer Max batteries. I did buy them for my Nikon digital camera Nowhere on the package does it mention using them in flashlights, like my non LED AA mini Maglight. I did a Google search on 'lithium batteries in flashlights' and could not find any site that says they can be used in flashlights, but they didn't say they couldn't be used. Does anyone have experiences using them in flashlights, or know for sure?
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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No problem. They mention digital cameras and GPSs because those are the devices with bigger demands and people are willing to shell out the dough. The packages also don't mention vibrators, right...? ;)
BTW, non-LED flashlight...? Why? The batteries last a helluva lot longer with LEDs. I picked up three 100 lumen CREE LED small flashlights (3@AAA each, included), for under $20. Blows even a big Maglight out of the water.
R
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Can you use Lithium cells in battery vibrators?
You sound like you like the Cree lights. Got a link to them online? So I can see, dream, drool and so on.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Oct 15, 9:12 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

There's a geek for _everything_. http://www.flashlightreviews.com
I thought I'd gotten 3 for under $20, but it mighta been 3 for under $30. I just picked them up from Costco, and I can't find the receipt. Here's the same thing from Amazon @ $30. (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Don't be fooled by the multi-LED lights. A single CREE or Luxeon is superior. CREE LEDs also produce very white light so there's very little color distortion. And there are also replacement LEDs for Maglites, which is a great upgrade as whatever batteries you're using will last much, much longer. http://ledsupply.com/led-flashlights.php
R
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On Fri, 15 Oct 2010 18:41:20 -0400, willshak wrote:

Why not be the first to test them in real life?
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On Fri, 15 Oct 2010 22:52:25 +0000 (UTC), "A. Baum"

Too late. I've used batteries that were reading "low" in my camera in a flashlight and they did work -for quite a while before they were totally dead. They were not as good as a standard flashlight battery, but I didn't expect them to be, having taken about 400 pictures in my Lumix.
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Lumix? Really? Zounds. I knew we had a brain link. I'm on my second LS-70. My number two camera (first one died after about 125,000 frames). Starting to get cantankerous. I think the lens isn't working quite right. Never fed it lithium AA cells, but I'm sure they would be fine. The camera seems fine on Powergenix.
I had been using NiMH Rayovacs. One time, the grandkids took 160 flash pictures in about the space of an hour with NiMY cells.
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On Fri, 15 Oct 2010 21:26:34 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Powergenix are rechargeable nickel-zinc - and about the ONLY rechargeables that have a high enough voltage to keep something like the LUMIX happy for any length of time.
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That comes with a promotion to field testser, grade two.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 10/15/2010 6:41 PM, willshak wrote:

No experience but I might want to check the voltage and amperage vs the batteries you are using. With all the various chemicals in batteries today 1.5 volts is probably nominal. Also flashlights tend to drain batteries rapidly. Don't know if this is a problem but here is a Garmin gps recall over lithium batteries overheating.
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On 10/15/2010 7:04 PM, Frank wrote:

This puzzles me also.
LiIon chemistry is ~ 3.6V. The AAs are definitely 1.5, so the battery is fundamentally different than the LiIon rechargeable.
My thinking is that for high drain flashlights, plain old alkaline may be about as good as it gets.
Don't really know. Maybe the Op will let us know.
Jeff
Also flashlights tend to drain

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Depends on the electromotive potential of the anode and cathode.
There are better references than this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electromotive_force
but small table shows:
Emf     Cell chemistry 1.2 V     nickel-cadmium 1.2 V     nickel-metal hydride 1.5 V     zinc-carbon 2.1 V     lead-acid 3.6 V to 3.7 V     lithium-ion
Originally most batteries were zinc-carbon or lead acid, in your car.
The lithium in this case must be coupled with something of lower potential.
To get higher voltages, you put batteries in series. Break open a 9 volt battery and you will find six 1.5 volt little batteries.
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On Fri, 15 Oct 2010 20:05:53 -0400, Frank

These are basically an alkaline battery "Lithium-iron", "Li/Fe". Used in Energizer lithium cells as a replacement for alkaline zinc-manganese chemistry. Called "voltage-compatible" lithiums. 2.5 times higher lifetime for high current discharge regime than alkaline batteries, better storage life in e.g. cars in summer due to lower self-discharge, 10 years storage time. FeS2 is cheap. Some types rechargeable. Cathode often designed as a paste of iron sulfide powder mixed with powdered graphite. Variant is Li-CuFeS2. 1.8 volts theoretical voltage.
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Yeah, but what is the cosine of that? Then, I'm also curious for the 3rd root to two sig figs, and using slide rule is legal in case the power is out.
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Christopher A. Young
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wrote:

For flashlights, plain old carbon-zinc manganese dioxide batteries are virtually as good as alkalines. Just don't leave the batteries IN the flashlight when you store it/them, or you might never get them out.
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Realizing, of course, that alkalines last 4 times as long as carbons. And that carbons go dead on thier own in a year or two. Me, well, I don't use carbons for much anything any more. They come in my HF free LED flash lights.
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On Fri, 15 Oct 2010 21:29:08 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Alkaline batteries do not do well in higher current applications - where heavy duty carbon zincs "shine" They have an awfull shelf life - that is true. Alkaline batteries were not designed to meet the very high power demands of today's electronic devices. Alkaline batteries have a high rated capacity, but they can only deliver their full capacity if the power is used slowly. A 3000mah rated alkaline only delivers about 700mah in a high drain application like a digital camera. About 1000mah on a flashlight, and 3000mah on a simple transistor radio. Carbon Zinc AA batteries will put out up to 950mah (fresh battery) under the same load.(.7 amp - flashlight) (Heavy duty Zinc Chloride - not the el-cheapo basic LeClanche type).And at well less than half the price.
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http://www.powerstream.com/BatteryFAQ.html Here was one page that has some about the matter. From what I've learned over the years, carbon zinc cells are nearly useless for high current draw applications. It's nicad and NiMH that do well with high current. I don't think carbon zinc cells would do as well.
About 20 or so years go, I did an informal test of carbons versus alkalines. I tried high drain (Pocket flashlight, might have been AA size mini mag) versus low drain tape recorder that I used about an hour a day (four C cells). In both tests, the alkalines lasted four times as long as carbons.
I encourage you to feed your Lumix one carbon, and one alkaline. Replace the carbon as the camera goes into low battery, and let us know how many carbons equal one alkaline. Actually, I may buy a pack of four AA carbon zinc cells at the Dollar Tree, one day. And take a bunch of pictures around the house just for fun.
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On Sat, 16 Oct 2010 09:51:30 -0700, Smitty Two

For which part? 2/3 of it is from Wiki, and 1/3 from experience several years ago.
As other sites have stated, load testing can give a distorted picture, but cyclic testing with a 2.2 ohm load (700 ma draw) yeilded just over an hour before the voltage dropped to the minimum spec (cannot remember what that was - something like .85 if memory serves correctly) while the duracell lasted less than 1 1/2 hours.
It was a fresh "industrial grade" heavy duty battery - cannot remember the manufacturer but I THINK it was Japanese.
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I'm also curious. From what I know, carbons are only useful for low load applications. Alkalines are much better under load. Nicad and NiMH excell under heavy load, as also the new lithiums. As I write, I'm doing a battery "shoot out" and will publish the results in an hour or so.
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