liquid dish detergent into your concrete or stucco

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And conversely if you add Tri-Chromium ( literally only drops) the concrete is 70% stronger. The chemical stops oxidation along the rebar's. This is an old Ferro cement boat builders trick. You can also re-enforce by adding 5 % silica.
Even today, cement mixing is an art, NOT a science. I would certainly not add anything but a small quantity of latex to cement.
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This is a trick used by concrete finishers for a long time; at least 30 years that I know of. Lots of others' experience tends to validate this, but I haven't used it.
Detergent isn't an approved admixture; however, the approved ones cost a lot more.
The theory is the detergent allows the fine aggregates to slip around more, making it easier to finish and to consolidate around reinforcement and forms.
If the mix is designed for the application, you shouldn't need to add detergent. If the mix sits in the truck too long, drivers tend to add water to "hide" the loss of plasticity. Detergent may do the same thing. If you accept this, you're not getting what you paid for.

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