Light Bulb Filament Repair Kits

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Oddly enough I have several times had a dead (common) bulb in a trouble light, suddenly flash, then keep working again. Juat a freak occurrance, I guess, that the filament welded itself. I dont remember the details, but I do recall one bulb that lasted a very long time afterwards.
Those "Marconi bulbs" remind me of toaster coils inside of a glass envelope. They're cool looking though. The filaments in them must be rated for a much higher voltage than 120V, because they burn rather dim, yet they do put out a fair amount of light. Kind of like wiring two standard bulbs in series. They do light, but are dim. They would probably last forever at half voltage.
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On 01/28/2015 03:58 PM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Yep, it's happened to me too.
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snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I've fitted four metal bodied table lamps in our home with "touch dimmers". They make it much easier to control the lamps than having to reach up under the lampshade to twist the socket switch when using a "3-way" bulb. And, a single 150 watt incandescent is much cheaper than a 50/100/150 watt 3-way bulb.
But, as I learned early on, when a bulb filament finally blows the "tungsten arc" which accompanies the "final flash" can draw a current surge great enough to blow out the dimmer.
I solved the problem by installing fuse holders with 2 amp quick blow fuses in each lamp. Now, when a bulb blows with an arc it takes out an easy to replace 15 cent fuse rather than a $10 wired in dimmer.
Another interesting "effect" of having those touch dimmers in the lamps is that during the part of the fall season when a few lady bugs move into our home, occasionally one of them will crawl up to the top edge of the brass bulb socket and walk around it. The tiny creature is probably seeking the heat from the lit bulb. If its legs touch both the socket and the bulb base the dimmer gets tripped. and the lamp changes intensity or turns off. I know I could put some sort of an insulator around the top of the bulb socket to prevent that but it happens so seldom I haven't bothered.
Jeff
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On Tue, 26 Apr 2011 18:51:42 -0500, jw wrote:

How come some people can turn on a computer, find Usenet, install Agent and subscribe to a news group while having an IQ around their shoe size?

Been using CFL for 7 years, most lamps are not crap. I have 4 23 watters outside for security that run dusk to dawn. Installed 4 in 2008, replaced one a month ago. I've replaced a total of 6 inside out of 12 in 7 years. Not crap by anyone's standards even though they are overrated for longevity I'm satified.
Flat panel computer monitors have been using CCFL backlight since they were invented.
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On Wed, 27 Apr 2011 22:43:37 +0000 (UTC), "A. Baum"

How do you know how big my shoes are. For all you know, my shoes might be ten feet. Or I might have ten feet and you must add the sizes together.
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In most light bulbs where ratio of watts to filament length (before uncoiling) is around or over 20 watts per inch, the bulb is filled with a mixture of argon and nitrogen. I heard on one web site, 93% argon 7% nitrogen.
In most with lower ratio of watts to apparently visible before-uncoiling length, the bulb has a vacuum.
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snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

You don't need a kit, just a couple of things found in any well equipped household; namely, a gas torch and vacuum pump.
Just use the torch to heat an area of the bulb to the point of softness, make a hole in it, remove dead filament and insert new, use pump to suck out as much air as possible (makes the filament last longer) while sealing hole with a syrupy glass rod. Learn to do it well and you'll soon have a nice little business servicing your friends and neighbors,
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On Thu, 28 Apr 2011 07:50:46 -0400, dadiOH wrote:

:-) Reminded me of this guy:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x3wrzo_fabrication-d-une-lampe - triode_tech
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wrote:

if you switch to outcandescents, all of these problems are averted.
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wrote:

And be sure to keep your burned out bulbs to screw into empty sockets so that the electricity won't leak out.
TK
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On 01/27/2015 04:56 PM, Tomsic wrote:

Or collect the loose electrons in a zinc tub.
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If you swap the polarity you convert them into dark suckers. They quit putting light in the room and suck the dark out of the room. Similar to revresing the flow in a heat pump and making it into a cold pump to heat and cool a house.
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On Tue, 27 Jan 2015 18:01:32 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

When you reverse the wires on a heat pump, it heats the outside, and it seems to do a good job too. It's always hot out when my friend does that.

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and so that nothing leaks in, either!
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And dont forget to rotate your bulbs once a year. Plus, if you live in an area which gets real cold weather in Winter, you need to install Incandescent "Winter Bulbs" during the cold months.
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