Levelling the shed

I'm putting up a storage shed in the back yard (a Home Depot package deal). My preferred location is in an area of the lawn that has about a 15-20% slope to the left as you look at the building door. Clearly, I can't simply drop the building on that part of my yard.
As a relative novice to this type of thing (carpentry, construction, etc.), I'm curious as to the best way to level the building in that location. I'm thinking of putting it on cement block all around, and digging down on the "higher" side (right side) of the building and then placing the block on the other side in such a manner as to level it out.
This may sound clear as mud, but if you get my drift, I'd appreciate any input as to whether this is a tried and true method...or if there are better ways of getting it done.
Thanks in advance.
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This is what I would consider .............
Forming and pouring a concrete pad. Make it higher than the uphill side so water will not come in as it runs down the hill. Maybe even make the pad slightly larger than the building and slope outward from there to get runoff. What you want to do is keep water from coming in under the building and getting everything that is on the floor wet. What you describe would allow the water to come in. Imagine what you are considering building in an absolute downpour for an hour, because that usually happens right after you complete a project like this. Or at least, it has when I have done it.
Forming for concrete is very easy, and it would be easy to get a level pour. True, concrete is pricey, but by the time you mess around with all the block, labor, time, etc, forming and pouring would be MY first choice. And it would give you a definite permanent pad. Check your local regulations first, and be sure to include conduit for any electrical BEFORE you pour. Also, you might include anchor bolts, or just rotohammer in some RedHeads to hold it down.
MHO, YMMV.
Steve
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so
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I like a pad too but that can lead to an increase in property tax in some areas (my area for sure and many others). Placing it on blocks would make it a temporary structure and exempt from assessment.

pour.
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For my area an 8x8 required no permit, a 10x10 would, check with your bldg dept to see if they need a permit or have restrictions on the foundation , for 10x10. A moveable shed on blocks also should not increase taxes, and your insurance.
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Dale Randall wrote:

Assuming cinder block foundation...
Step 1. Find the lowest part of the foundation Step 2. Scrape off the top layer of grass & soil under entire area shed will cover Step 3. Place block level in lowest corner Step 4. Dig for next block, place and level Step 5. Repeat step 4 until all the way around Step 6. Place landscape fabric inside the foundation and cover with gravel (supposed to cut down on rodents burrowing underneath)
Tips: Try not to add soil (just remove it) as settling is more apt to happen when you have to back-fill
If you are out of level by more than the height of a single cinder block you're going to need to build a more substantial foundation (Piers or mortared cinder block "walls" for a foundation)
You can use 8" cinder block on the low side and work your way to "cap block" on the high side
No matter what. Don't let the wood directoy touch the ground when installed. (Cinder block is enough of a sponge......)
HTH Brad
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deal).
simply
You don't mention the size of the shed? Personally I have always used posts; collecting pieces of old telephone poles, treated posts etc. etc. Maybe six posts would be sufficient? Depending on size of shed, also frost depth, here going about 24 to 30 inches is good. So posts need to about be 36 inches long. A post hole digger is very useful for digging neat straight edge holes. the advantage of posts is that they are relatively cheap, simple to install, easy to cut off after placing so shed is level and provide an air space under the shed which avoids dampness and rot. If the local moggies congregate under, some chicken wire or pieces of trellis is useful. The only disadvantage is that a step or small ramp may be required to wheel in grass mowers, snow blowers etc. by the some 6 inches plus the thickness of the floor that the shed floor will above ground level. Personally we put our sheds a little higher than 6 inches so the space underneath not only allows good air flow but can also be used as temporary storage for lengths of pipe etc. Our oldest shed is 20+ years old.
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posts;
install,
wheel
put
I did pretty much the same thing for my shed in 1991. I poured concrete piers 4' down (required by code to be surpass the frostline here in the mid-Atlantic). I embedded bolts into the wet concrete and bolted galvanized brackets that held 6'x6' pressure treated posts. I nailed rim joists around and laid plywood over top. No problems in 13 years.
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I did my HD wood shed that way, the easy way, not with concrete or bolts. I used 9 concrete blocks, for an 8x8 shed. 3 down the middle support, 3 on each side. Where it was higher I buried the blocks. You do not want it to touch dirt, and having a airspace around will help it to not attract moisture and rot. Also consider buring galvanised heavy screen around it attached at the shed to keep critters from making a home underneath. You do not need concrete or bolting it down unless it is in a feild and will be exposed to extremely high winds. Just level all blocks before assembling the shed.
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mRansley, what you're describing with the concrete blocks is exactly what I had in mind. The shed is 10x10, I have nine blocks sitting next to the shed materials, and plan on running 3 down the middle and 3 on each side, digging deeper on the "high" side.
I'm also planning on keeping it above the dirt level, allowing for air circulation, with a plastic moisture barrier underneath.
TNX...

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I'm thinking of getting such a shed from home depot. How is it packaged? Are all the parts pre-cut? How is it delivered? Are the instructions clear? Are there any additional materials that must be purchased? Is there a tool list? A projected amount of hours to complete the construction?
I'm pretty handy but obviously there are a lot of unknowns involved, so anything you can find time to share will be most appreciated!

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They are like a giant erector set. Everything is there, you just need a few basic tools. An electric drill is helpful for a lot of the screws. Not rocket science. Easier with a helper. Could take a whole day if you are not familiar with such construction. They are meant to be easy to build.
Steve
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Unfortunately, this is not the best place to ask such questions- you really should ask the people you'd buy it from. For manufacturer's specs if poss.
If it helps any, I put together a 10x12 kit from HD a few years ago. Packaged in a couple of multi-hundred-pound cardboard boxes. Pieces therein ready for assembly. Floor and below were my problem, and floor dimensions I was given were off by 3.5" on one axis. Instructions quite clear- not rocket science here. Paint and roofing extra. Basic tools (hammer, screwdriver) okay. Power-driver, nailer preferable. Time required way too variable to speculate. Again, not rocket-science; and extra pair of hands really helps.
John

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Well, since it's a work in progress, I can tell y'all that I started with the floor kit yesterday (10x10), and got rained out, so all I had at the end of the day was the floor frame and joists assembled (in my garage).
It took me approx 90 mins today just to prepare the site (I'm putting it on blocks) so that everything was level. Since I'm working alone, it then took me another hour or so to cut the floor decking and screw it into place. At that point, I had other obligations and had to quit. I now have a floor on a concrete block "foundation."
So...I'm hoping that the rest of the project will be a little less tedious, and that I might be able to finish up tomorrow (forecast: rain), as I have the entire day off.
I'm not terribly disappointed with the materials, instructions etc., but I will tell you that some of the wood was warped, and I had a hell of a time getting things square (or, should I say, ALMOST square).
Had I enjoyed bluebird weather and no interruptions, I'm guessing it's a day and a half job. Paint, roof shingles and floor decking are extra.
I'll post an update when I'm finished.

packaged?
there
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One other thing:
Minimun 5/8" plywood decking is recommended, and that's what I bought. Were I to do it again, I'd get 3/4". While walking on my new floor this afternoon, it seemed a little spongy.

construction?
so
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Dale Randall wrote:

How far apart are the floor joists? I just had a 8X10 shed built and it has 12" OC floor joists. No bounce to that floor.... even if it is just resting on some cement blocks.
I paid a little extra for 16" OC wall studs and ceiling joists. I'm not too worried this is going to fall apart any time soon. I ran electicity out to it last week and have two unswitched outlets and one switched outlet (with a double 4' fluorescent fixture plugged into it).
Rather than a ramp eating up yard space, I chose to use temporary 2 X 12 ramps... the type people use on the tailgates of pickup trucks. I just slide them back into the building after I roll the John Deere inside.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

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24"

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Dale Randall wrote:

There's your problem. I think closer floor joists would have a much more beneficial effect on the stiffness of your floor than using thicker plywood. Is it too late to pull up the plywood?
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN

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