Lessons learned on my first alt.home.repair mortar & flagstone job! (thanks to all)

Page 3 of 3  
On Tue, 07 Feb 2012 19:41:12 -0500, Norminn wrote:

At first I did try the 2x4 but then I just tapped directly on the sandstone. The stone broke. So, for all the rest of the stones, I didn't soak them in water nor did I tap as hard.
Unfortunately, partially as a result, water pools on the shelf in the wrong spots. http://picturepush.com/public/7517927
But, it will have to do. Luckily it doesn't rain all that much out here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Another lesson learned was to cut the stakes for the form.
I kept catching my clothes on them, and, especially during the 7th hour of this, I kept tripping over them.
I couldn't drive them in any deeper (they were hitting something mighty hard - probably concrete) so I should have cut them off with the saw so I wouldn't have tripped on them so many times! http://picturepush.com/public/7516823
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 07 Feb 2012 15:56:49 -0800, Oren wrote:

You are observant.
In TWO places there was a sprinkler head within an inch of where I put the shelf. I had no choice.
One of those two places had to be shored up with a form, which required stakes as shown in this picture below: http://picturepush.com/public/7517942
So, while I don't know where the water line lies, the stakes must be VERY CLOSE to them. I didn't think to test. I'll test tomorrow. I hope I missed them!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chuck Banshee wrote:

Did you make a video? Can we see this whole project on YouTube? :)
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Really-- Chuck. Get a cheap Canon powershot digicam. Then go to http://chdk.wikia.com/wiki/CHDK , download the freeware for your camera and set that baby up for a time lapse shot.
For all the work you did documenting lessons learned, a 60 second video would be a great reward. [for *you* and *us*<g>]
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 08:21:53 -0500, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

I've seen those time-lapse videos - and some are well done (others make the music the big theme ... and they move around too much).
My wife tells me I am a 'blogger' at heart ... although I've never blogged ... so maybe I should set up a web site for people who are clueless (namely me), who still try to do stuff.
It would give inspiration to the other clueless folks who need inspiration and courage.
BTW, you guys gave ME the courage I needed to move forward ... thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 06:49:39 -0500, dadiOH wrote:

The pictures are a pain ... plus there is cement all over my Nikon SLR!
A video cam on a tripod with time-lapse set might be best after all.
BTW, it's a pain for me to view links on my usenet reader (I have to cut and paste into a browser). Are you guys using a usenet reader that you can just click on the links - or do you also have to do the cumbersome cut and paste into a browser?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 8 Feb 2012 14:07:58 +0000 (UTC), Chuck Banshee

You don't need a video cam. My video cam is a few years old, but was supposedly 'the thing' at the time for time lapse. A Canon powershot [a point and shoot camera] is a lot less money, so you don't worry about it getting wet & dirty.
The CHDK [Canon Hack Developers Kit] software is open source, doesn't affect the camera [it goes on the memory card] and has a lot more flexibility than my video cam. It also does a lot more things, like motion detection, even color detection. [I can set my camera up and only have it take pictures of the Cardinals when they show up at the feeder.]
I think you're geek enough to really have some fun with it.

Get the free version of Forte's Agent--- then get the newest version for $30. The links are a small thing-- imagine getting all the twits to disappear. I can't imagine doing Usenet without kill filters these days.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chuck Banshee wrote:

Click link, browser (Opera or IE 6.x) opens page, photo is displayed on page..
A link is an URL...an "internet shortcut"...Hyper Text Transfer Protocol...it *should* open in a browser. If it doesn't on your machine your file type associations are incorrect.
Or are you saying that your usenet reader doesn't recognize URLs? If so, dump it (or maybe configure it)...even OE does URLs. What reader are you using?
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 14:20:31 -0500, dadiOH wrote:

I'm using Pan on Linux as my USENET nntp reader.
The only way I know how to use a browser is to use google groups, e.g., https://groups.google.com/forum /#!forum/alt.home.repair
But I vastly prefer a 'real' USENET client. Anyway, I'm ok with mine (it just doesn't do links). I was worried about you guys.
BTW, here's a picture of my 'curing process' using towels. http://picturepush.com/public/7524996
How long should I keep it wet (I'm planning a few days)?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 08 Feb 2012 18:19:19 -0800, Oren wrote:

Oh. Ok. That would be easier than ruining perfectly good towels!
For some reason, I 'thought' I had to keep it wet for a few days ... but I can easily spray it in the morning and afternoon if that's all it needs.
I was wondering how the water was supposed to get to the good parts UNDER the stones anyway.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My fingers are painful (it hurts to even type) and today, I still had to scrub the newly laid sandstone today to change it from this: http://picturepush.com/public/7518038
To this: http://picturepush.com/public/7518040
My hands now look like this: http://picturepush.com/public/7518043
But, one thing I learned is that every piece of grit hurts my fingers!
I found it hurts slightly less if I put nitrile gloves on UNDER the work gloves! Like this: http://picturepush.com/public/7518045
LESSON LEARNED: I should have STARTED with the nitrile gloves under the rubber covered gloves (I'm surprised nobody mentioned that) for added protection from the caustic chemicals and abrasive grit!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.