Leaking Hose

Hello,
I recently bought a brand new hose and screwed it as tightly as I could (by hand) to the spigot (I've never actually used this spigot before and it's pretty old). When I turned the water on, some came out of the other end of the hose, but a significant amount was spraying out of the top of the hose. In looking closely at it, the water was coming out of a gap between the 'collar' of the hose, and the hose itself. In looking at it, it seems like there's a gasket in the end of the hose, and perhaps I wasn't tightening the hose enough to create a seal between the end of the spigot and the gasket in the hose. Is there a solution for this? Get a wrench and tighten even more? Get another gasket and put a second one into the hose?
Thanks in advance!
-Ben
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Try cleaning off the hose and the spigot and then spraying some non- stick frying pan stuff on the threads and redo. That might be enough. also, bedure the washer/gqasket in the hose is seated all the way. Some have tqabs that stick out and keep you from seating it all the way toward the hose, altho tht would cause a leak between the fitting and the hose, not between the hose and the spigot. If still leaking, a pair of slip-joint pliers is usually all that is needed, nothing as big as a pipe wrench.
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wrote:

Try cleaning off the hose and the spigot and then spraying some non- stick frying pan stuff on the threads and redo. That might be enough. also, bedure the washer/gqasket in the hose is seated all the way. Some have tqabs that stick out and keep you from seating it all the way toward the hose, altho tht would cause a leak between the fitting and the hose, not between the hose and the spigot. If still leaking, a pair of slip-joint pliers is usually all that is needed, nothing as big as a pipe wrench. ================================================= I've got a great all-rubber Craftsman house that has sat out 24x7 for over 20 years, most of it pressurized. It's been frozen with water inside, run over and abused but has always worked. But recently the coupling at the nozzle end was run over and now is slightly out of round. Nothing sort of retapping or reforming it into a perfect circle will keep it from leaking. Tried O-ring, Teflon tape, Teflon rope, nothing. It's a common "end of the road" for hoses, even good ones. Next time I'll look for one that won't deform if run over on the gravel driveway.
-- Bobby G.
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Look for cracks in the bottom of the threads first. You might need a magnifying glass if your eyes are like mine. Sometimes, you can even see light coming through if you hold the end up to a light source.
Sears will replace those all rubber Craftsman hoses... bent, cracked and/or otherwise, no questions asked and no receipt required... take it back and get a new one. That's the main reason you originally paid a premium price for it.
Replacing the end might void the warranty... but suspect the individual employee you end up dealing with will really be the determining factor.
If cracked, no amount of straightening, washers or sealer will help...
Erik
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More... look for hose's with ends machined out of brass... not stamped out of sheet metal.
While it is possible to damage machined brass ends, it's difficult. They are by far the best available.
Erik
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wrote:

over
inside, run

the
sort of

leaking.
of the

won't
see
Did you have to show a receipt? I am not sure I could find mine after 20+ years but it does need to go because of the out-of-round problem.
H:LotS
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On Fri, 27 May 2011 18:39:13 -0400, "Robert Green"

Oh for crying out loud, buy a new end for about $2 to $6 and replace it. I'd opt toward the more expensice brass ones. Those cheap $2 plastic ones are crap. As long as the rest of the hose is good, it's worth the money. You will never round out a flattened end. Just replace it.
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FWIW most hoses come with cheap hard washers that don't work very well. Do yourself a favor and get the fat black O ring type washers that compress and seal well.
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Did that, still leaked although the O-ring did a better job than the washer, it still hissed and chattered like a demented squirrel (spraying water as it "sang") whenever I changed position with the hose. Once the threads are buggered, maintaining a leakproof seal is close to impossible.
-- Bobby G.
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Ben wrote:

Try the hose on another spigot. If it still leaks, the hose is at fault. If there is no leak, the original faucet is the culprit.
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wrote:

If th spigot is at fault from not being used for years, run a file over the end of it to remove burrs and crud. Just be sure to keep it flat. Hold file in BOTH hands. Try another washer first. Sometimes they are just dried up. Even new ones.
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