lawn boy mower won't start

I have a 2-cycle lawn boy mower that was left to me by previous home owners. I've used it the past two summers. The first summer I had trouble starting it. Took it in for repair and was told nothing was wrong, so I hate to waste more money.
Here's the deal. Ran it empty last fall and stored it over winter. Added gas this spring and it started up. Used it a few times before trouble began. First sign of trouble...it started and then died shortly thereafter. When I finally got it restarted, it kicked out some smoke. It then ran ok for a few weeks. The last few times, when I try to start it, I prime and pull, prime and pull, prime and pull...nothing. I assume at some point I'm flooding it and give up. The next day it will start on the first pull with no priming. But the last two times, after it starts (after sitting overnight) it runs for 10-20 seconds, dies, and won't restart. It happens so fast I don't have a chance to try and give it more gas. I've tried changing the spark plug, checked the air filter, it's got fresh gas (with proper oil mix). When it wants to start it fires right up. Any suggestions?
Thanks, Chris
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Chris wrote:

Hi, Maybe intermittent electronics ignition module? Do you get spark? Tony
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I had the same problem a while back. I replaced the solid state device and haven,t had a problem.

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change the lower seal

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Could be electronics, after it fails pull the plug wire and have someone pull the cord and short it to the block to see if you are getting spark. Or it could be a crudded up carb. but Ignition modules usualy start to fail first with heat of the motor. May or may not be worth repairing, do a compression test to get an idea of engine wear first.
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Seems to be sparking fine. Sounds like it might be more than this girl's up to...maybe it's time to relent to the repair shop. Thanks for all the suggestions.
Chris
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You do mean sparking fine when hot just after it died and hasnt cooled down , right . Well then its fuel. But dont test it cold.
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on the older lawnboy 2 stroke mower change th elower seal The lower seal is subjet to more wear and tear from the enviroment and if the lower bushing/bearing is worn it will also subject the seal to more abuse. The problem you described sounds like the lower seal is the problem.

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Chris wrote:

The next time it won't start try this. Unscrew the plug, connect the spark plug wire to the plug, ground the threads of the plug, pull and check for a spark. If there is no spark, or it is weak you can try a new plug. If you have a spark, squirt or dribble into the spark plug hole about a quarter shot glass of gas, and reinstall the plug. If it kicks now and wants to run then you have a fuel delivery problem.
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squirting any gas or Either directly into the cilinder risks a hole in the piston, better is through the carb. To big a boom can happen.
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m Ransley wrote:

Can you please explain how squirting gas directly into the cylinder risks burning a hole in the piston. I use the carb when possible but sometimes it's just not practical because the air cleaners are buried so deep like on motorcycles and snowmobiles. I understand the incompressibility of a liquid but even a 25cc string trimmer can swallow a a few cc's of gas without going solid. Anyway, this would most likely break a rod or a crankshaft, not burn a hole in the piston. Could it be that I've been very lucky not to have burned a hole in the piston every time I have done this over the past 35 years?
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When you spray directly in , more than a drop or two it combusts all at once, much more than normaly goes through the carb, Through the carb or intake it will not go directly in and will vaporise better. Either in the cilinder is bad. Ive heard of piston rods being shot out the case this way. Its just a saftey issue for the motor, the cilinders are so small that especialy Either [ starting fluid] direct can mess the motor permanently. If you havnt had a problem you have done it right, but a little to much could be real bad. I would mostly worry with Either, its explosive.
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did you get new gas this year or was this last years gas you put in it?
randy
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New gas this year. New spark plug and air filter.

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On 28 Jun 2004 19:30:42 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Chris) wrote:

Is it new enough to have the safety lever that kills the engien when you let go of it? If so check the safety on the side of the engine. there is a very cheap "switch" there connected to one wire. When the switch is closed it grounds the ignition system so you don't get a spark. The switch gets messed up and stays closed even when you have the safety lever squeezed.
Steve B.
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