Laminate flooring question


I'm looking to replace the cheap flooring that's down in my dining room now. I have a sample from home depot. It's dupont product with the padding glued to the back.
I had Empire come out and I showed him the sample. He said it wasn't a good idea to have that backing glued to the back. He recommenced a separate padding (Vapor barrier) then flooring.
Is there any pros or cons to this? Does it matter?
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I've only ever used the separate padding, but I don't see why it would make a difference in most cases. It does make a difference if the floor is being installed below grade and it would not be a solid moisture barrier.
Have you talked to a local flooring dealer? I've bought flooring three times now and got equal or better prices from the local guys compared to the big box stores. Also had better selection and service. I have no experience with Empire aside from annoying commercials.
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I will have to agree find someone besides HD, I've also found much betters deals than the big box stores.
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Anthony Lisanti wrote:

Did he say why?
Also check www.lumberliquidators.com - they are as much as half the price of HD.
And yes, this is a job you can easily do yourself. I've done four rooms and a 30' hallway. I liked it so much, I even used laminate flooring as a countertop.
I'm gonna do the dog house next.
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Use the little bitty leftovers for the bird house.
Joe
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I got one bid from empire and will never get another, they were double the price of several regular installers who supplied products, so the padding is on the piece, what does it matter.
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ransley wrote:

Empire is the modern version of the old door-to-door siding salesman. They are mainly in the money-lending business- the product is just a hook to get you in the tent. Same class as rent-to-own stores. Rule of thumb- never deal with a vendor that offers their own financing, and pushes it hard. Most of these companies don't really want cash customers. They want people that can't see beyond the monthly payment.
-- aem sends...
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What matters is... installing the floor consistent with the manufacturers directions. I would tend to trust Dupont's recommendations. But, whatever they are, you'll blow their warranty if you don't install per their instructions.
Obviously, it will also depend on the site conditions. If you're installing well above grade on a completely dry sub-floor, you don't have to be concerned too much about moisture (except for spills and leaks). If you're installing below grade and/or over concrete a sound moisture barrier is critical.
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Pure speculation:
I have put down laminate flooring and it came out great. It was the separate padding. Anyway, when it's installed, you must leave a gap at each wall of like 1/4-1/2" per mfgrs instructions. The floor floats and the laminate will expand and contract based on room temp & humidity. If there were no gap it can buckle. Others have attested to this actually happening.
The typical padding is not made to move on the floor and will tend to grip some. It's the laminate that slides with a much less coefficient of friction on the padding.
The folks at DuPont are a lot smarter than me about flooring for sure. Hopefully they have figured it out. But then again, there was the masonite siding and the band connectors for the plastic water pipe major blunders to name a couple.
I'd be leary of this one till it's proven. Who knows how many years that will take.
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A vapor barrier means nothing unless it on one continuous membrane, vapor will get through all the gaps in the separate pieces. It is also not needed if it is a suspended floor over a living area. You only need it between the living area and the outside or ground.
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So, since my basement is below, this would be considered a suspend floor right? There's a laminate down now, but areas are buckling and that's why I want it ripped up. This was done before I bought the home. it looks like they shoved it as right as possible against the walls. I would assume this is why it buckled.
Also have to worry about the dog too. Sometimes he can have a little accident before my wife and I get home.
HD already jerked me around. I had a appointment for them to measure everything and this guy called me up and said he couldn't make it. I has to make a new appointment. You would think in this economy they'd go out of the way to do the work.
On Sun, 22 Feb 2009 19:31:43 -0500, "EXT"

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