L6-30 Power PLug


I am new to this who Power calculation thing, what does the "L" stand for in the notation "L6-30"??
Does it mean "Locking" or "Leviton" or something else.
And what does the "6" means as well? I asusme the "30" is Amps.
Any insight on this would be very helpful. I know this is an easy question, but I need help.
Thanks all!
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It's called a "NEMA" number, and it describes plugs, outlets, and cord bodies, to make it easier to match things up

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Locking, 250 volts, 30 amps
Take a look at www.leviton.com/sections/techsupp/nema.htm (straight blade) and www.stayonline.com/reference-nema-locking.aspx (locking blade)
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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On 17 Nov 2006 16:43:51 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The information seems easy to find. I just did a search on "NEMA receptacles".
An "L" at the beginning is used for a locking plug or receptacle.
The number before the dash indicates a row on a chart, representing different voltages receptacles are designed for:
1- 120V no ground 2- 240V no ground 3- 277V no ground 4- 600V no ground 5- 120V 6- 240V 7- 277V 8- 480V 9- 600V 10- 120V/240V no ground 11- 240V delta no ground 12- 480V delta no ground 13- 600V delta no ground 14- 120V/240V 15- 240V delta 16- 480V delta 17- 600V delta 18- 120V wye no ground 19- 277V wye no ground 20- 347V wye no ground 21- 120V wye 22- 277V wye 23- 347V wye 24- 347V
The number after the "-" is current capacity in amps. Standard capacities are 15, 20, 30, 50, 60.
There could be a final "P" for plug or "R" for receptacle.
A L6-30 is a locking plug or receptacle for 240V (ground but no neutral) at 30A.
Hopefully, I got that right
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The number additionally indicates the number of poles (current carrying conductors), and wires (total including ground).

    2-pole / 2-wire

    2-pole / 2-wire

    2-pole / 2-wire

    2-pole / 2-wire

    2-pole / 3-wire grounding

    2-pole / 3-wire grounding

    2-pole / 3-wire grounding
24- 347V (yes, the number is out of sequence. it was added later.)     2-pole / 3-wire grounding

    2-pole / 3-wire grounding

    2-pole / 3-wire grounding

    3-pole / 3-wire

    3-pole / 3-wire

    3-pole / 3-wire

    3-pole / 3-wire

    3-pole / 4-wire grounding

    3-pole / 4-wire grounding

    3-pole / 4-wire grounding

    3-pole / 4-wire grounding

    120/208V wye     4-pole / 4-wire

    277/480V wye     4-pole / 4-wire

    347/600V wye     4-pole / 4-wire

    120/208V wye     4-pole / 5 wire grounding

    277/480V wye     4-pole / 5-wire grounding

    347/600V wye     4-pole / 5-wire grounding

    2-pole / 3-wire grounding (see above)

Not all connectors are made in all configurations. For instance:
Locking connectors are defined, but do not appear to be made in NEMA     configurations in the 50 and 60 amp sizes. Non-NEMA connectors     are in common use, as are Pin and Sleeve type connectors.
Straight blade connectors are not defined for voltages above 347V.
Locking connectors are not defined for L3 and L4 (277V, 600V).
Locking 15A connectors are not defined for more than 3 wires.
30A is the most universal size in locking connectors, available for     L5 thru L23.
Other special NEMA types:
ML-1    125V 15A 2-pole / 2-wire miniature
ML-2    125V 15A 2-pole / 3-wire grounding miniature
ML-3    125/250V 15A 3-pole / 3-wire miniature
FSL-1    28V DC 30A 2-pole / 3-wire grounding
FSL-2    120V 400HZ 30A 2-pole / 3-wire grounding
FSL-3    120V 3 phase delta 400HZ 30A 3-pole / 4-wire grounding
FSL-4    120/208V 3 phase wye 400HZ 30A 4-pole / 5-wire grounding

    Don't forget "C" for connector body (cable end).

Not bad.. :-)
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Vaughan) writes:
| Locking connectors are defined, but do not appear to be made in NEMA |     configurations in the 50 and 60 amp sizes. Non-NEMA connectors |     are in common use, as are Pin and Sleeve type connectors.
Do you know whether Hubbell's 50A twist-lock products (e.g., CS6365C) are NEMA? Or their 50A marine inlet series which is similar (and seemingly compatible, but without the center spike on the outlet)?
                Dan Lanciani                 ddl@danlan.*com
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No, they are not.
The NEMA standard for 50 and 60 amp connectors seems to have fallen by the wayside.. I have catalogs from 3 different manufacturers from 1988, 1994, and 2004, and the 50 and 60 amp locking connectors appear on a chart in the Leviton 1994 catalog, but are not offered as a product. They do not appear on the chart in either the 1988 or 1994 Bryant catalogs, or in the 2004 Pass and Seymour catalog. In fact, I only noticed them on the chart while I was fact checking my previous post. They do not appear to be offered as a product by P&S, Bryant/Hubbell, or Leviton.
I think the reason for this is that the California Standard (CS) patterns had been adopted by mutual consent within the industry, and the problem of using the same connector for multiple voltages had already been resolved before the NEMA standard came along.
In addition, there are several different types of locking connector that are used at the 50 and 60 amp level, as well as the 100 amp level, including TurnLock/HubbellLock and IEC309 pin and sleeve type connectors.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/l6-30-power-plug-167255-.htm imagevin wrote:
Dan Lanciani wrote:

-------------------------------------
Found this when doing a google search for something else and figured I'd answer this in case someone else saw it. Hubbell's 50A twist-lock style plugs and connectors are not considered NEMA. They are referred to as "California" standard or style. Here is a link that lists the different style 50A twist lock plug and connectors: http://www.lockingpowercords.com/Category/31-50a-plugs-and-connectors.aspx
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NEMA_connector
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