Kitchen cabinets: common DIY mistakes?

Im sitting here looking at my old 1970s ugly and delapitaded kitchen cabiets. Im thinking to myself "How hard can it be to replce"? With the exception of the long sink/dishwasher run with plumbing and a tricker couter top (L-shaped), the rest of the kitchen seems basic: level, shim secure to studs. Am I missing somethign? ;^)
Im sure I am. What are the most common mistakes made by DIYers? I figure even if I mess up somewhere, its still WAY better whats there now. Thoughts?
Thanks Todd in Cincinnati
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The most common mistake is believing it's an easy job.
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True... ;-)
The OP may want to consider whether the existing cabinetry is in reasonably good condition, and if so, replacement doors and a little sprucing up may be all he needs.
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Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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On that note: we had considered new doors. When ordering new doors, and you want a more modern light wood style, and your orignals are dark 1970s cabinets - what are your options?
snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote in message (Todd W. Roat)

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"Todd W. Roat" wrote:

before you get new doors. ask around for someone who builds cabinets. see the price difference. we were in the same boat. a friend recommended this guy. we have around 20 cabinets beside the dw. it is going to cost 8,000. that is for birch ply and poplar case, and white oak fronts. also includes laminate counters.
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Are you planning on staying with wood grain? If not, just paint the exposed surfaces. If you are, you can veneer the exposed faces and stain to match. Paint the insides if they're too dark.
Some vendors specialize in refurbishments, and offer "kits" containing doors and face frame refacing materials.
It's simply a matter of what you can afford, and deciding on an appropriate compromise.
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snipped-for-privacy@uc.edu (Todd W. Roat) wrote:

Quite a few options, depending on whether your cabs are real wood all the way thru or wood veneer. If it's real wood, you're in luck because what you're looking at isn't how the wood looked when the tree got cut down. The cabinetry would just need to be stripped and refinished to whatever state close to or removed from the natural tone you want. In fact, when refinishing, there's nothing that says the doors have to perfectly match the countertops and/or cabinetry. Having nicely contrasting cabs and doors with some killer modern-looking hardware can be pretty zesty eye candy in addition to reducing the cash cost.
If they're veneer, there are companies out there that can remove the old veneer and replace it with whatever wood look you want.
AJS
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Good answer! Hope I didnt offend anyone with that perception. I know it will be hard, I think waht I meant to say is "isnt it straighforward". Thanks
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (HA HA Budys Here) wrote in message (Todd W. Roat)

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It ain't super-easy, but it ain't brain surgery either. Take your time, take your time, take your time....that's all the advice you need to make a good job of it. A 2nd pair of hands is a big help, but it can be done by one person. Oh, and be sure and take your time...measure, level, shim and secure.

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snipped-for-privacy@uc.edu says...

Don't buy cheap crap cabinets. Avoid particle board at all costs.
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<snip

The most common mistake is insufficient detail in planning. It helps to have an experienced kitchen designer review your plan, down to the moulding details and the types of pulls (handles). Then find an experienced finishing kitchen installer to carefully review the plan, too. Otherwise, even when you think that you've covered everything, you'll find that there's something that you wish you would have done differently.
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The easyest way is to change the doors of the cabinet. Even you can buy already done doors. The only you need is to apply a finish to them...

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Todd W. Roat wrote:

Design: If you design a stack of drawers on an inside corner of your layout, include a 1" filler - so the drawers will clear the hardware on the adjacent run of cabinets.
Installation: Start at the highest point on the floor - easy to shim up, but hard to grind off a cabinet to lower it. Pencil a level reference line on the wall. Use a framing square to plumb down to any cutouts needed (pipes, electrical, etc.)Mark the reference line so you can transfer the measurements to the cabinet to be cut.
For the wall cabinets, start with the corner cabinet if you are using one. Shim out to account for the worst place the wall bows into the kitchen space.
Use clamps while screwing adjacent cabinets together.
Good luck,
Bram Sorgman
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You may need more room than 1" depending on pull/handle hardware and what's on the other side (oven/dishwasher/etc.).
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If cases are workable and you decide new doors sanding the cases will get back to clear wood. As it has been sealed about all you can do is clearcoat or maybe a gel stain then clear coat. Do you know what the wood will look like after sanding? I sanded cases without plastic barrier for doors so had sanding dust in back corner of closet in far corner of house 6 months after the work.
On 1 Mar 2004 16:43:24 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@uc.edu (Todd W. Roat) wrote:

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Thanks for all the warnings and advise - it helps. I think all of you should just come over and "show me what you mean" ;^)
snipped-for-privacy@uc.edu (Todd W. Roat) wrote in message

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