key ring where to buy?

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Hello all...
was frustrated recently by a key ring and realized that I'd been meaning to ask for a while where one should buy them. Of course, the obvious answer would be "a hardware store" or "a locksmith's shop" but let me explain...
Every key ring that I have seen offered for sale is pretty much the same, it's a ring (actually a double ring) of spring steel that you put your keys on. However, when I drop my car off at a mechanic's and they put one of those little tags on my key ring, the ring that they use to hold the tag is infinitely better. It's a triple loop of much smaller spring steel, thus making it easier to get my keys on/off the ring if I have to, and more importantly, if I have a very large key that requires that the key ring be sprung open wider than normal (such as a car key,) it still springs back to normal. The key and the remote for my company car are also held together by such a ring. However I have never seen this kind of ring offered for sale, but I'd gladly buy 10 or 20 of them if I had.
Anyone know what I'm talking about, and know where I can buy some of these? Currently I have one key ring that I have to periodically wrap with scotch tape so keys don't fall off in my pocket. It got "sprung" when I put a 50 yen piece on it (the 5 yen and 50 yen coins have holes in the middle) for decoration, I know, dumb idea in retrospect. I'm sure one of the other kind would have been fine however.
nate
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Why don't you ask your mechanic where they get theirs?? WW
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wrote:

When I drop my car off, which is rarely, they use much cheaper rings, that go about one 1.3 times around and I'm sure I could bend with my fingers.
The simplest thing I can think of is to ask the place you drop your car off if you can buy some. If they say no, ask them where they buy theirs. (Truly, it's funny how people work and this second question may cause them to say, here's some for free, or at least to name a price.)
Then I would try keyrings.com . Hey, there really is such a page, although it is mostly personallized keyrings and may not really have much variety mechancially. But I see they do have a category called Split Rings, except on my browser it's empty. :( http://www.namifiers.com/Products/Category.aspx?expansionID=SPLITKEYRING

No. I don't think I do.

Googling on split key ring bulk gave a bunch of things including: (Amazon.com product link shortened) but I don't think one can tell if they are what you want. You could write the vendor. Write via ebay so your questoins and answers are recorded there.

What?

Is this a troll? If yours is sprung, get another one for 5 cents or a quarter. The new ones aren't sprung. (Unless you shop at a specialty store for spring rings.) It doesn't have to be triple. The ones they sell everywhere and often give away for free are fine.

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I didnt read your post super carefully (not enough "white space".....I've got more than a bit of 'ADD')
take a look at these McMaster.com
86805T39 Zinc-Plated Steel Split Ring, 1.159" ID In stock at $8.61 per Pack This product is sold in Packs of 25
OTOH how about a spare for the mechanic?
cheers Bob
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the pic shows the kind I don't like, the heavier gauge wire with only 2 turns, that tend to get "sprung" easily

might just have to ask him next time I take car in, but the ones they use are pretty small in diameter unlike a "normal" key ring of 1" or 1.25" or so
I know they exist as I have *one* but it came with car
nate
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Actually I have, at the one near my house, all they have are the kind I don't like. Same with the hardware store down the street.
nate
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wrote:

So buy another car.
I've been using the ones you don't like for 50 years and I've never had one come close to springing. Just stop putting big coins with holes in the middle on them and use them for keys only.

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Some of my keys are similarly large, is the problem. I can't stop carrying those. For some reason auto mfgrs. in particular seem to like to make keys have goofy big plastic heads with the holes in them far away from the edge of the key.
nate
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Try a marine store. They have such rings in various sizes to secure pins. As a bonus the material will probably be highly corrosion resistant.
                Dan Lanciani                 ddl@danlan.*com
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Which gradually occurs by itself over time until, one day, the keys fly all over the place when you pull the ring out of your pocket. Not fun in a dark parking lot.
I'll repeat the advice that others have given the OP: get another copy of your car key; put it on a small, plain ring by itself with a tag listing the make, model, and color of your car; and use that whenever you need to hand over your car for service, cleaning, or parking.
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On 2/8/2011 12:40 PM, Neill Massello wrote:

Good solution for an older car, but anything recent, those damn smart keys are expensive.
--
aem sends...

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At least Ford smart keys aren't all that expensive as long as you buy the spare while you still have at least two others. I think the last one I bought was $12. With only one it they can get $75, or so.
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On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 19:45:10 -0600, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Weird. Is this in person? Can you borrow a neighbor's second key so it looks like you have two?
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No. If you have two, you can reprogram the third yourself using the car's computer (it's somewhat of a pain, but the instructions are in the owner's manual). They just cut the keys (blanks aren't expensive). If you only have one, they have to do it and they'll likely ding you for an hour labor.
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wrote:

I don't believe that is true for all makes of autos. Some locksmiths can now program chipped key blanks,again for certain makes only.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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On 2/10/2011 11:02 AM, Jim Yanik wrote:

This is true. From what they told me, a lot of small-town dealers that don't need to create that many keys, and don't want to buy the machine and keep the software updated (or a trained operator on the payroll), now job out the work to a local locksmith. When I bought my 1-key van, dealer gave me the magic number, and pointed me at the locksmith they use. And it was still north of 120 bucks for 2 normal-sized but chipped, no-button keys. So I now have 3. I keep meaning to buy a couple uncut blanks off ebay, and get them cut cheap at hardware store, and program them myself. I'm well overdue for losing a keyring, and it is best to be prepared. I wish I could find a programmable separate-from-key button fob that would work with an 05 Caravan, because there are times the buttons would be nice, since 3 of the 5 doors have no lock cylinder. I just can't live with that bizarre serving-spoon-sized combined key and fob- my pockets aren't that big. What idiot thought that was a good idea?
--
aem sends...



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I said, Ford. I'm sure some screw you over worse.

With a Ford, anyway, it's not the key that gets programmed. The car's computer has to be told that the key is valid. Two keys or a third party (the dealership) is how it determines "programming rights". Maybe Ford allows locksmiths to have the secret handshake that allows single key (or no key) programming, don't know.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

By coincidence there is a thread on alt.locksmithing with info on Ford transponder keys http://preview.tinyurl.com/4bverq7 message 4 The message will not be archived and will disappear Feb 17
--
bud--

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On Wed, 09 Feb 2011 23:06:12 -0600, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Thanks. My little mind would never have come up with something this complicated.
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It's not really that complicated. To keep a valet, for instance, from duplicating a key, two keys are needed (the owner isn't likely to turn two keys over to the valet) or a trusted person (the dealership or locksmith) to validate the key to the ignition. Validating a key is sort of a pain because the user-interface is pretty bad (turn signals, heater controls, and check engine light, IIRC), but it's just a matter of following directions.
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