Kerosene Questions...


I bought a 5 gallon kerosene can for $2 at a garage sale to use as steamer to try wood bending.
As a little extra bonus, there were 2 gallons of kerosene in the can; but I have a few questions about it.
1) It is blue! I've never seen blue kerosene before; is it something different? 2) It is probably old. Kerosene doesn't spoil does it? 3) There was a crack in the cap; not very big, but if it has been there for years there could have been some evaporation. In gasoline all the most volatile stuff would have evaporated, making it pretty useless; but would it matter for kerosene?
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Aviation fuels are tinted to make them easy to recognize. I'll bet your "kerosene" is really jet-A. I'm not sure of the color for jet-A, but you can check this out by calling an FBO at a local airport.
Toller wrote:

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Toller wrote:

Nope. Kerosene that is dyed blue usually indicates a premium (dyed red too) kerosene product that is whats recc. for flue less heaters (ie: kerosene heater).

Why chance it. Take it to your local petro station and have them dispose of it. As for jet fuel - it's blue too. Kerosene is also used for aero fuel as well - blue.
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snipped-for-privacy@nf.sympatico.ca wrote:

Premium (sometimes called "lamp grade") is clear with no dye. The higher the quality of kerosene the clearer it is. It is hard to find because most heating fuels are required by taxing authorities to be dyed so if they inspect a trucks tank for example if the fuel is colored they know that the road use taxed hasn't been paid.

Only gasoline aviation fuels are dyed. Jet A is definitely not dyed. One of the acceptance tests is to soak some on a filter paper and compare to a chart. Colorless is best and only very slight yellow shades are acceptable.
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Toller wrote:

Color is just what it is. Refineries color it for various reaons and there are no universal standards.
Old could be a problem. There was a death around here this last winter due so a kerosene heater. It was reported that they had used old fuel and that it had caused the problem.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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He tells me the blue could be a local regulation, or it could be jet fuel. Jet fuel is just good kerosene, so it is fine.
He said the old/aired kerosene ought to be okay, but suggested burning a bit in a kerosene lamp to be sure. If it doesn't burn well it could be a little water, which adding some acohol might clear up.
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Toller wrote:

But its misinformation. Jet A is not dyed.

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that in a kerosene lamp. Hmm, what to do...
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Throw it out...buy new stuff. Kerosene ain't that expensive. Use it on a bon fire or something outside if you must use it.
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Use it for parts washing or in A torpedo heater. The one I have can burn kero or diesel fuel.
H.R.
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

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