just wondering

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As I was driving home tonight, I drove past a house under construction. They were at the stage of having the basement poured, the floor joists strung, and the main floor plywood down. It does not rain around here that often, so I think there would not "normally" be a problem with the exposed plywood. What do they do in high precipitation area like Seattle and such? Do they keep it covered all the time till the walls are up, and the roof is over it? I realize a large crew can have this done in a few days, but what about small town 1 to 3 man crews where it takes weeks to get walls and a roof up? just curious what happens to the plywood? thx
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nefletch wrote:

Blue tarps.
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Van Chocstraw wrote:

Back in the days of real plywood and real 2x10s, we didn't worry a whole lot about it. As long as water didn't stand on the wood for days, there was seldom any big problems. Any ponding that did show up was an indication something was out of level. Otherwise, when the rain stopped, sweep the water off with a pushbroom and push on. Not certain what the SOP is in today's world with OSB decking, engineered joists, ad nauseum. Absent a sudden weather emergency, it should never be exposed more than a few days, even with a small crew. Any site where it takes weeks, is probably an owner-as-contractor, or owner built.
-- aem sends...
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There is now an invention called treated lumber.
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AZ Nomad wrote:

Huh? Who frames house with PT lumber? Is it legal?
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wrote:

No, it is not legal.
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On Sep 1, 5:59am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

re: "No, it is not legal"
D*mn. Now I gotta start all over.
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AZ Nomad wrote:

AFAIK, other than for sill plates and elevated/covered porch framing, it isn't used in residential construction. Not sure it is even rated for use in enclosed heated space. Assuming you are talking about the green stuff, of course.
-- aem sends...
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And why would any person in his right mind use it where it isn't needed. That stuff costs a lot more than standard framing lumber.
Harry K
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Actually in some locations PT is cheaper. Because they use a lower grade of wood than standard framing lumber.
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On Tue, 1 Sep 2009 11:01:13 -0700 (PDT), jamesgangnc

I used PT against the concrete floor. Most PT 2x4s are soaked in chemical and as they dry they split, warp and twist and introduce internal stress. Horrible stuff as it dries.
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wrote:

For internal use it is approved ONLY for sills in contact with concrete.
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Huh? I'm missing something. Please enlighten me on treated subflooring.
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I guess I was confused. I thought it was used for framing.
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That never happens to me :-)
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>As I was driving home tonight, I drove past a house under construction. They were at the stage of having the basement poured, the floor joists strung, and the main floor plywood down. It does not rain around here that often, so I think there would not "normally" be a problem with the exposed plywood. What do they do in high precipitation area like Seattle and such? <
http://www.gp.com/build/product.aspx?pid 96 or do nothing at all..Depends on the builder
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They make it. It is megabucks (and crappy like all PT wood). It is not used for interior residential subflooring. And AZ Nomad was confuzled. There you go. What was the question? :)
Lefty
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It dries out if it doesn't puddle for to long of a time. I worked for a builder and at times if we had a house that filled up with rain I would take a large screw driver and poke holes in floors to drain the water into the basement. At times we did replace some areas if they started sagging. In areas where we used OSB I was surprised it would dry out pretty fast.
Jerry
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/MyWoodWorkingPage
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/1974RuppCentair
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nefletch wrote:

When it rained on the place they were building across the street, they had to use a planer to shave off expansion of the OSB flooring at the edges of the boards.
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OSB don't know. Many types of plywood of reasonable quality these days are made with waterproof glue. So as long as no puddles of water and/or piles of water soaked building material it all dries out.
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