Is this wire Legal?

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HorneTD wrote:

...

Thank you for contradicting your own pearls of wisdom, right in your own reply. It just goes to show that you Codebots (who haven't a *SOLITARY CLUE* about common sense) are destined to drown in your own anal-retentive hand wringing.
There is a 100% solid ground connection when you have BX in a metalic connector of a metalic box and you have a receptacle in that box where the ears are mechanically attached to the ground screw. To aregue any different is to admit that you defy the truth sitting in front of your face. Keep it up, the rest of us will accept the *FACT* of what we see with our own eyes.
Meanwhile, anybody who speaks of "impedence" while talking of a 60 Hz circuit is a bigger fool than you were the day you were born. HINT: "Impedence" means *NOTHING* at sub-RF frequencies. For *ALL* intents and purposes, the "impedence" of a 60 Hz AC circuit is identical to the resistance. Nice try at attempting to muddy the waters with meaningless information, moron.
--
The real Tom Pendergast [ So if you meet me, have some courtesy,
aka I-zheet M'drurz [ have some sympathy, and some taste.
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You forgot a part...
...where you cannot guarantee that the ears will have proper contact to the metal box...
...hence the reason the manufacturer puts the screw on the receptacle in the first place. The ears on the receptacle are NOT grounding point and should NOT be relied on as such.
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Noozer wrote:

That would fall under the "piss poor workmanship" clause. If you don't do work good enough to make sure your fixture is mounted securely in the box, then you *DESERVE* to get shocked from the lack of a ground on that receptacle.
Come on, in all honesty, you're talking about some moron who would let the duplex receptacle *HANG* *OUT* of the box, and be satisfied with that type of installation.
Code protects idiots who don't have a clue. Some of us are a bit above that, thank you.
--
The real Tom Pendergast [ So if you meet me, have some courtesy,
aka I-zheet M'drurz [ have some sympathy, and some taste.
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Too bad you've never actually installed a receptacle. You might want to notice the little plastic/cardboard squares the put on the screws so they don't fall out of the recepticle during shipping. If you don't remove them (and nobody does) they make great insulators. As for the rest of the ear? It's resting on drywall if you know anything about how to cut it open for the box, so they won't hit the box either.

Too bad you aren't.
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Noozer wrote:

BWA HA HA HA HAA! That's precious!

You assume everybody has your poor workmanship habits! Wrong, loser.

Don't forget about the screw itself, moron!


Whatever. Try a quick continuity check, Einstein.
--
The real Tom Pendergast [ So if you meet me, have some courtesy,
aka I-zheet M'drurz [ have some sympathy, and some taste.
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I-zheet M'drurz wrote:

It may have continuity, but what about the impedance? ;;-)
Best regards, Bob
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Noozer wrote:

I really don't know what the code says but would prudently ground the receptacle to the box using wire and the green screw.
But,the rest that you say is not accurate. The cardboard squares have nothing to do with shipping they are to keep the screw on the receptacle period, whether in shipping or whenever one has reason to open the box and pull the receptacle out. Boxes that are placed correctly in drywall allow the ear of the receptacle to touch the box; the only purpose of the ear is to maintain the receptacle level with the wallboard when the box is placed too deep so that the plate, which uses short screws, will fit. Many people break the ear off or even cut the wallboard so that the the metal of the receptacle contacts the box. All of which makes absolutely no difference since the metal of the receptacle is grounded to the box through the two screws. It is just as efficient and effective electrically as the green screw to a wire. BTW, both the grounded and the grounding wire, at least in many receptacle, are connected to that metal strap that ends in the ears.
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Like hell they are.
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Didja notice the *metal* mounting screws that are in direct contact with the *metal* device yoke, that are also in direct contact with the *metal* box?
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On Mon, 10 Jan 2005 12:29:31 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

And the foot bone is connected to the ankle bone And the ankle bone is connected to the shine bone .....
:-P
later,
tom @ www.BookmarkAdmin.com
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Noozer wrote:

PS: I always thought the manufacturer put the screw on the receptacle was that there was no guarantee it was going into a metal box. !.
--
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aka I-zheet M'drurz [ have some sympathy, and some taste.
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I-zheet M'drurz wrote:

As predicted anyone who disagrees with you is a moron and you now better than Underwriters Laboratories. The lab must have been in league with the manufacturers of self grounding receptacles when they tested the effectiveness of mounting screws alone as the Equipment Grounding Conductor pathway for receptacles and found them to be inadequate. Because if they disagree with the all knowing Tom Pendergast they cannot be correct. They must be a "code bot." When you have crawled down long snotty hallways looking for other peoples relatives for a couple of years I may have some respect for your opinion on public safety issues but until then I will not be the least bit concerned about disagreeing with you. You see I have held the dead child in my arms who died in a fire of electrical origin that was caused by a fault in a lighting outlet supplied by the older BX cable that you have alleged is adequate for grounding even without the bonding strip that modern AC cable has because "anybody who speaks of "impedence" while talking of a 60 Hz circuit is a bigger fool than you were the day you were born. HINT: "Impedance" means *NOTHING* at sub-RF frequencies. For *ALL* intents and purposes, the "impedence" of a 60 Hz AC circuit is identical to the resistance."
You are right of coarse about my being a moron. Why else would I crawl into the buildings that all the intelligent people like yourself have already run out of. Why else would I work to educate the public on public safety issues based on consensus safety code rather than on my personal opinion. And to top it all off if I disagree with the omniscient Tom Pendergast what else could I be. -- Tom H
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Check with your inspector. I don't think this is legal in the US any longer. The older BX used to have a third soft non-ground wire that ran through it and which was folded over the cable at the terminal ends to provide continuity though the metal armor. Ron

Garage
a
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