Is This The Best Electrical Code Book To Have?

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I'm planning on doing some electrical work and I want to make sure it will be up to code. Is this book sufficient, or should I buy the "full" code book?
Things I want to do are:
- add a junction box in the ceiling of my utility room (for a ceiling light)
- add a breaker to serve a new outlet for a "space saver" microwave above the stove.
I'm fairly new to this. I have put in two hardwired undercabinet light fixtures as well as the basic stuff like installing ceiling fans and light fixtures to existing junction boxes. Would this be a good book for someone like me to reference and make sure that everything is 1.) Safe and 2.) Passes inspection for selling the house?
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Sam,
No offense, but the book is probably over your head. The terms used in it, etc, can be confusing to even the most experienced master electrician; I doubt you will find a single thing in it that will help you accomplish your goals. Also, the NEC won't list any variations your locality may enforce.
As you are going to be opening your panel, I'd recc you get a different type book.... time/life makes some good ones.
If you are worried about passing code, which is a good worry to have, call the codes dept after you do the work to have someone come check it out.
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I agree completely with Matt. You want a book that talks in simple, easy to follow terms, not a code or code translation book and then try to find someone in the business to take a look at what you do. I am a licensed "master" electrician in NY and every three years or so when the NEC puts out a new code book ,I have to buy a book to explain the changes. Believe me, it's not made for normal people to understand "Matt"

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For actually code stuff, I'd prefer (Amazon.com product link shortened)08075571/sr=2-1/ref=pd_ka_b_2_1/104-1105110-2446309 . It's very short-handy, 'tho -- won't help you if you're looking for a "how-to" book. Neither one of things you list are particularly difficult to get right, code-wise, so it should be plenty. Frankly, knowing that you want a separate breaker for the built-in microwave doing better than most.
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Andy Hill wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)08075571/sr=2-1/ref=pd_ka_b_2_1/104-1105110-2446309
I can see why you might want a separate breaker for a built-in microwave? But does the code require it? Counter top units just plug into whatever outlet is available along with the toaster, the undercounter light telephone, toothbrush charger, electric knife, electric whatever.
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wrote:

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(Amazon.com product link shortened)08075571/sr=2-1/ref=pd_ka_b_2_1/104-1105110-2446309
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Common sense requires it. Most countertop units sold today use far less current than a built in. I just checked the plate on mine. It pulls 13 amps. That doesn't leave a lot of capacity on a 20 amp circuit when you figure sustained pull at 16 amps (80% of 20).
Colbyt
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Colbyt wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)08075571/sr=2-1/ref=pd_ka_b_2_1/104-1105110-2446309
I don't think there is a difference in built in and counter top. If anything built in units are usually smaller. 1500 watts is about as large as a common unit gets and that is the size of my counter top unit. But there are lots of 1200 and 1000 watt units also and judging by the models available, the trend in power has been downward.
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The "code" books confuse experienced electricians. You will get far benifit and understanding from a book like this:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)08084187/sr=2-2/ref=pd_ka_b_2_2/103-8334042-8823067
I have an older edition that has answered evry residential question I ever needed an answer to.
Colbyt
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I use that book myself and its big the larger edition, Practical Electrical Wiring. I think for the job you want to do the Wiring Simplified is a good buy. Ron

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(Amazon.com product link shortened)08084187/sr=2-2/ref=pd_ka_b_2_2/103-8334042-8823067
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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Thanks to everyone for that tip, much appreciated. "Wiring Simplified" sounds like what I need.
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While you're waiting eagerly for the book, checkout this site: http://www.selfhelpandmore.com /
Mr Fixit eh
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Ron Wrote:

Ron's right about Colbyt being right! to
-- tomeshew
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Although having the complete code available is good, I would suggest you start out with these two titles:
a. Black & Decker's "The Complete Guide to Home Wiring" - ISBN 086573429.
b. Practical Electrical Wiring, by Hartwell and Richter - ISBN 0960329498.
My experience in performing my own electrical modifications at home has been that the hardest part is running wires / romex inside of an existing structure and NOT understanding what is code compliant. I am a stickler for a professional looking job, which means I don't run conduit on the outside of my home, nor do I run wires inside of Wiremold or some other visible wiring crutch. I do all my work inside of drywall or the attic (or underground) which adds tremendously to the time/effort required, but the job always looks great. From your description of your first two jobs, I'd say you'll be dealing with these issues also. Be prepared to learn more than just electrical stuff. However, it's VERY satisfying to see the finished job and know that you did it yourself, and you probably did a good a job (or sometimes better!) as many professionals do.
rob

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As a middle-tier amateur, I will also vouch for "Practical Electrical Wiring" as a better book than most of the others. It actually explains the reasons for the Code, giving plenty of examples of fires and shocks (and, beyond the anecdotes, insurance industry statistics) and will turn you into a believer. It's much nicer to understand the rules and follow them for a reason rather than grouching about them when they seem to make no sense. This is not a short read, but certainly worth the time.
While less complete, I also like Rex Cauldwell's "Wiring a House". It has tons of practical advice. The pictures he supplies of real encounters with horrible work (e.g. fully energized water pipes) is quite memorable.
HTH...
--
Steve Kives -- Unix sysadmin/netadmin -- Denver, CO
Forward and fiaka, Manacle an den gosaka
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