Is it hard to install DSL yourself?

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I have been trying to get DSL, and they all want to send a kit (assuring me since I am not a technical person at all) that it's very easy to install by yourself. Has anyone here done that, and is it easy? I mean, really easy...like any moron could do it easy? :-)
--
Cheri


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Cheri wrote:

In most cases it really is that easy. The best bet is to get their supported home router option, often with WiFi, so that 1. the ISP will directly provide support, and 2. the only connections are power and the phone line.
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OK, great. Thanks for the quick answer.
Cheri
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"Cheri" <gserviceatinreachdotcom> wrote:

I was going to answer, but since I did it three years ago and don't remember anything about it, I did not want to be the first. I am thinking that since I don't remember much about it, it couldn't have been that hard. I tend to hold grudges and would still be po'ed at the phone company if there were any problems.
K
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"Cheri" <gserviceatinreachdotcom> wrote in message

plug into the wall outlet and then plug the phone into the filter. Be sure not to plug the modem into a filter. There is a special filter for wall phones that hangs on the wall bracket and then hang the phone on that filter. Don't forget answering machines (if they are separate from the phone) and fax machines. If you have a phone that has one or more remote units, only the main unit that has its own phone line needs a filter . The remote units do not need a filter. If you have a monitored alarm system, call the company and tell them to come out and install a filter on their system.
The hookups to the modem and computer etc is straight forward. Cables are different colors and the directions with the kit will tell you which cable goes where.
Charlie
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2008 11:42:33 -0700, Cheri <gserviceatinreachdotcom> wrote:

Plug phone cord from wall socket to dsl modem. Plug AC adapter into wall, other end into dsl modem. Connect network cable from computer to dsl modem.
Install filters on all the other phone extensions.
Boot computer.
That's it.
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Cheri wrote:

But the software/configuration can be a nightmare. It took me ~5 hours to get a friend hooked up to att/yahoo in Northern California. ATT's installation software sort of destroyed everything in its path. Your mileage may vary.
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Bennett Price wrote:

Yes, avoiding installing *any* ISP provided software is a good thing. Getting the ISP's supported home router package generally helps the novice user avoid the ISP's malware.
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2008 11:42:33 -0700, "Cheri" <gserviceatinreachdotcom> wrote:

The self-install kit includes
DSL "modem" Splitter Filters (to put on all extension phones, fax machines, etc) cables installation CD
If you follow the instructions carefully, you'll be up and running within a few minutes. No technical skills needed. You'll get an 800 number to help if you get stuck.
Try to locate your modem away from motors, microwave ovens, neon lights, transformers, etc. and try to pick a location close to a phone outlet. You should also position the modem where you can easily monitor the status lights which will help with troubleshooting. You may have problems, although fixable, if you have a security system that uses the phone.
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On Sep 24, 11:42am, "Cheri" <gserviceatinreachdotcom> wrote:

It's fairly easy but not "any moron can do it" easy. It's when you have problem and have to call someone from India to try to fix it, that's when it's a real problem.
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"Cheri" <gserviceatinreachdotcom> wrote in message

Unless you're a blonde......
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"Cheri" <gserviceatinreachdotcom> wrote in message

It is easy enough that most vendors deliver with a money-back guarantee or require payment only after successful connection.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2008 11:42:33 -0700, Cheri wrote:

One word of caution:
You do need good quality phone circuit wires in the wall. Almost all homes built in the last 20 years or so will be OK. Last 10 years even better.
If your home is over 50 years old (pre 1960) you could be in some trouble. You may have to re-do a lot of your phone system wiring in such a case.
Wait until it is proof this a problem.
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Thanks to all for the replies. I have decided not to do it, and I do live in a house that was built in 1963. I think if I do something, I will go with Comcast Broadband, since I do know that they come to install it, and I believe it connects through the cable. I'm old now, and after reading the responses, I just don't care to DIY with electronics.
Cheri
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2008 15:53:37 -0700, "Cheri" <gserviceatinreachdotcom> wrote:

In my area internet with Comcast is $87 a month, AT&T DSL Lite is $20 a month. DSL gives you a private connection, cable internet is shared with everyone in your neighborhood.
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Phisherman wrote:

DSL is shared with everyone in the neighborhood (Telco CO or RT) as well. Cable is normally considerably higher data rate than DSL as well.
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wrote:

[snip]
That's what you hear in DSL ads. It's true, but incomplete. The internet itself is shared.
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Gary H wrote:

You seem to be replying to the wrong person, and your information is inaccurate as well.
For a cable modem, your connection is shared with the other houses (with cable modem service) in your local "node", typically 250-500 potential homes.
For DSL, your connection is shared with other houses (with DSL service) in your local Telco central office for older areas, or the Telco's remote terminal (a.k.a. RT equivalent to a cable "node") servicing your neighborhood.
So, cable or DSL are both connections where the bandwidth is shared with others in your neighborhood. Of course all Internet traffic is on shared circuits ultimately anyway.
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Where I am, it's on a special right now for 25.00 installation 34.99 per month for six months and then 39.00 after that.
Cheri
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Cheri wrote:

I've had both DSL and cable. In my opinion all the talk about sharing service and bandwidth is, while technically accurate, absolutely useless for the ordinary user. Unless you spend your time uploading and downloading huge files, you will never notice whether you are using the faster or slower service. I routinely email large jpg files, and never saw a difference between the two services.
I had two phone lines, and dsl would not work on the newer line. Apparently the switches at the phone company CO were more robust years ago and could handle DSL, while the newer switches won't. Since I live too many yards from the CO, this affected my service.
As to installation, my DSL company sent very clear instructions, and as they were a local company they were easy to call with problems. A lot of the difficulty with DSL installation appeared to involve coordination with the phone company, and as my DSL provider was a local company, they had the connections to get things done promptly and right. Alas, my local DSL company was gobbled up by a national company, and the good personalized tech support disappeared. When I called tech support and their first question was what state I lived in, I saw trouble on the horizon and after a few problems, I switched to cable.
Perhaps because my cable company was just getting into the business, I had some problems with installation. One tech insisted that since my cable drop ran through an underground conduit, it was getting wet, which was affecting my service. I drained the conduit (there was some water in it) and the cable worked, but then went out again. The next tech pointed out that the drop was waterproof, and the problem was with the cable modem they had installed (apparently an outdated model). He replaced it and now for a couple of years the service has been flawless. They even offer to come out (for a fee) and hook up a second computer, but I was able to do that on my own easily.
So I think, unless you get DSL from a good local company, cable is the better option, as you are then dealing with a single company, and as they often have packages that save you a bit on your TV cable or cable phone.
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