Is condensing coil in duct work for air handler a DIY project

I had a private repairman come over to fix the leak I have in my heating coil. He said that he does not do this work. I had previouslly asked if the heating coil replacement was a DIY project. You guys told me no.
New question. This new guy said that the problem is a "condensing coil in duct work for air-handler" for 1 of my zones. Is this a DIY project? He suggests a HVAC guy.
If it is not a DIY I will look for an HVAC guy.
What do you think?
Thanks much,
Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC
Contributing writer for FUTURES Magazine Author of RECRUITSOURCE PEOPLESOFT EXAM and RECRUITSOURCE SAP/R3 EXAM Author of POWER TIPS FOR THE APPLE NEWTON and INTRODUCTION TO CSP
NOTE: To send me an email, remove TAKEOUT from my email address: snipped-for-privacy@seldin.net
NOTE: My web home page: www.seldin.net
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It's not a DIY, it requires specialized equipment

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Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC wrote:

It is not a DIY, you need equipment and in most cases a license.

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On Apr 11, 7:57 pm, "Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC"

Unless, you have a leak of _water_ condensing on the coil, and not being allowed into the drain line. Like, from a clogged line, which could be dealt with using a wet/dry ShopVac. Just suck out the clot.
Leak of refrigerant would leave a residue of refrigerant-oil, but neither refrigerant or water.
HTH, J
HTH, J
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wrote:

I think I've finally figured this out. He may have a water coil in a plenum with a blower in an air handler to move the air over the coil to heat it. The boiler is separate and may even be feeding multiple heating coils in different zones. Not all that common in a residential setting, but very common in commercial heating systems. Take a look at this system http://www.toolbase.org/Technology-Inventory/HVAC/modular-air-handler-hot-water-coil
If that is the case, yes, it can be a DIY job if you can solder a joint. Assuming the connections are soldered, they may be pipe fittings on the header. It may even be possible to repair the leak once you find it.
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Ed,
You showed a good picture of what I got. I have a heater and A/C unit combined. What I understand. The attic has an A/C unit for the upstairs and the basement contains the heater and the A/C unit for the downstairs. However, the heater in the basement also services the upstairs zone.
So based on your picture. I have this duct work that contains a coil that is leaking. So is that something I can fix as DIY?
I am contacting an HVAC guy today.
- Larry
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You have a hydro-air system. One boiler supplies radiators in both the upstairs and downstairs blower units. Each blower unit also contains cooling coils for the AC. If you can find and get to the leaking pipe inside the radiator, you could probably solder it. The unit may have to be removed to expose the leak, which may be more than you want to tackle

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coil. He said that he does

was a DIY project. You

duct work for air-handler"

What kind of leak and what kind of system is it? If it's a freon leak you need a HVAC company with special equipment.
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This is definetely, a wqter leak and not a freon or oil/water leak. Water is very clear on the floor.
The duct (or airblower) is easy to get to, as the one that is leaking is in the basement.
Can someone give me step-by-step directions on how to open up this metal duct. I can determine that since it's from this duct, that it's the downstairs zone that is leaking.
Then, how to replace it. I understand this is general instructions not related to a specific boiler, but I am assuming I can figure it out, if I had the basics.
Thank you.
Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC
Contributing writer for FUTURES Magazine Author of RECRUITSOURCE PEOPLESOFT EXAM and RECRUITSOURCE SAP/R3 EXAM Author of POWER TIPS FOR THE APPLE NEWTON and INTRODUCTION TO CSP
NOTE: To send me an email, remove TAKEOUT from my email address: snipped-for-privacy@seldin.net
NOTE: My web home page: www.seldin.net
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Here is what I have so far:
The duct size is 22 X 17. My plumbing supply store says that I need a 15 X 20 coil.
So I need some basic instructions (maybe a Web site picture of how to take apart the duct and how to remove the coil and then what to solder (I have soldered my outside pool heater pipes.
My plumbing supply store says I have to shut off stuff that goes to upstairs unit so nothing leaks out of system, so I need to know what steps I should take.
Does someone have these instructions posted somewhere?
Thank you.
Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC
Contributing writer for FUTURES Magazine Author of RECRUITSOURCE PEOPLESOFT EXAM and RECRUITSOURCE SAP/R3 EXAM Author of POWER TIPS FOR THE APPLE NEWTON and INTRODUCTION TO CSP
NOTE: To send me an email, remove TAKEOUT from my email address: snipped-for-privacy@seldin.net
NOTE: My web home page: www.seldin.net
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You need some basic mechanical skills and tools, and the ability to solder. You need some method of testing hte coil, even a simple as attaching a hose so you can see the leak.
Not being able to see the unit I'm not able to give you a step by step. The basics are:
shut off the supply line to the system and drain if possible. disconnect coil feed and return remove coil. probably some sheet metal screws holding everything in place find and solder leak. You can always take it to a car radiator repair shop if you can't find or fix it. Reverse directions
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On Apr 12, 8:35 am, "Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC"

Wrong! Assuming you've got anything so standardized.
At least you should by now have a communicable picture of the generalities of what's there in the HVAC system. No small accomplishment. Keeping a notebook? :')
All the duct systems I've seen are _custom_made_ for the particular job, making "go to url/page3" impossible. Rather, instructions would be more like: 1) Locate builder's means of closing up ductwork around heating coil, and determine how to open it with min destruction; may require cutting. Study system providing heated water to determine how best to disconnect coil to facilitate previous. 2) Assemble all necessary parts/supplies/tools on site. Certify that replacement coil can be fitted and connected with items on hand. Else goto 1) 3) Disconnect liquid lines from coil per recon. 4) Remove coil. 5) Assembly is reverse of disassembly, kinda. Except you may need to add some sheet- metal to close up opening in ductwork, as you determined in 1) 6) Refill all lost liquids so system is at normal pressure. Assume there will be leaks, and find them now. 7) Pass beer to helper.
IOW, if you gotta do this with "training wheels" on, you'd do well to call a pro. Then work up to such projects over time. Honest. Maybe a pro will let you watch/ help if you leave him a little space.
HTH, J
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Barry,
I have a York A/C with a Weil-McLain burner. I am looking to install a (15 X 20 Coil) for my duct size of (17 X 22)
Here are some questions:
I see screws that I can unscrew my duct. I will then need to remove the duct tape. My first question, is without draining anything from the burner or turning it physically off, can I unscrew the duct tower to get a look at what is involved. Meaning, will the unit still operate if the duct is opened but not full taken apart.
I am good at following written directions. I can also solder and work with PVC piping (which does not apply). I am trying to get a look at what the coil looks like inside, so I can figure out what I need to do.
Thanks much,
Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC
Contributing writer for FUTURES Magazine Author of RECRUITSOURCE PEOPLESOFT EXAM and RECRUITSOURCE SAP/R3 EXAM Author of POWER TIPS FOR THE APPLE NEWTON and INTRODUCTION TO CSP
NOTE: To send me an email, remove TAKEOUT from my email address: snipped-for-privacy@seldin.net
NOTE: My web home page: www.seldin.net
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Should be able to do that. You should se ea coil that is made up of copper tubes running through aluminum fins. You may or may not see the leak. Look for some crud or runs.
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I'm curious as to terms. Heating, we usually refer to heat exchangers. If you have a 90% plus efficiency furnace (vents exhaust gasses through PVC tubing) then you could have a condensing heat exchanger.
On the other hand, an evaporator coil for an AC system takes condensation out of the air. Which are you referring?
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