instructions for concrete shed base


Would anyone know of some simple instructions anywhere, to help a novice to build a concrete base for a metal garden shed to store garden tools. The base is to be three metres by three and a half metres.
Amongst other things I would need to find out is what quantity of cement, sand, etc I would need to buy and whether I really need to get one of those electric mixers or I could just mix up on a wooden board. Grateful for any advice. Thanks.
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wrote:

Local authorities often have rules for this kind of thing. I suggest you start by checking there. It is a real pain to have to dig up your work just because you did not ask.
Different areas have different weather and soil conditions so what might work well where I am could be worthless where you are.
That is a large area to try and do yourself, even with an electric mixer. Do yourself a favor and have it done or find a friend or neighbor who has done it before to help you plan and do the job. You are going to want more than one person working it, Even a pro would have problems doing it single handed.
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On Jul 22, 4:57�pm, snipped-for-privacy@columbus.rr.com wrote:

buying concrete by the bag like sakrete, will likely cost way more than buying it premixed by truck.
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It will take about 1 1/4 cubic meters or yards to pour it 4 inches thick. Also must add some rebar or wire to it.
In the US it will cost about the same for about 50 of the 80 lb bags that will be needed. It will cost more than a delivered ammount, but you will be charged a delivery fee for the premix that will make it cost about the same. YOu can get about 3 or 4 yards delivered for the same price as one yard delivered.
It will take about 5 or 6 hours to mix it by hand. Somewhat less with a small mixer. You can rent a small mixer that will hold 2 or 3 bags at a time. That would make it about 20 loads at 5 minuits a load. Almost 2 hours of mixing.
I just filled a hole with 45 bags of premix for an antenna tower about a year ago. Rented a small mixer to do the job. Took about 4 hours of mixing and such. I had the concrete in 80 lb bags delivered. It would take many trips to haul the 50 80 lb bags I got in my small pickup. Would not recommend it, but I could not get a mixer truck to where I wanted it.
Think I had about$ 300 in it counting the delivery charge and rent of the small mixer. At that time it would have been about $ 90 per cubic yard for the premix, but would have had to buy atleast 4 yards or get charged for delivery.
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One thing I would look into before pouring a permanent base for your shed is how your town's tax assessor will consider it. Sometimes permanent installations such as pools and sheds are taxed. Too avoid this some people just put the shed on concrete blocks or railroad ties which can be removed.
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john westmore_______ wrote:

Back-of-the-envelope indicates about three tons of concrete. Are you sure you want to tackle this?
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As others have noted, it depends on where you live. In most jurisdictions in the US, you will need to foot the slab. In some places, that foot may be 3-4 inches as you get further north in the land of the danmyankee snow, the foot may be 2-3 feet.
In my rarely humble opinion, a concrete slab for a metal shed is overkill.
Dick
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Dick Adams wrote:

Previous Owner planted a metal shed in an abandoned dog pen, so it is surrounded by chain link fence. Of course, he didn't bother to modify the gate where he tore down the fence run that went down the middle, so the 2 gates don't meet or latch. (Been on my to-do-one-of-these-days list since I moved in 3 years ago...) Only downside is, it sure is a PITA to clean the leaves and pine needles from the dead space around the back 3 sides of the shed, and while the enclosed slab area in the front is nice, it also collects a buttload of leaves that would otherwise peacefully blow away. I'd tear the fence down, but it might appeal to a future buyer, since it would be easy to modify back into a dog pen where the dog would also be resident security for the stuff in the shed.
-- aem sends...
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Well, as stated, check FIRST with local authorities. You MAY be able to put the shed on beams or RR ties, then concrete inside that for a nice floor. USUALLY, if it goes on a slab, you need a permit and all sorts of government intervention unless you live in a lenient reasonable jurisdiction, which are becoming rare. If it goes on a slab, it is considered permanent, and if it is mounted on wood, it is considered temporary. If you can get on the "good" side of the inspector, he may counsel you on how to tapdance thusly inside the lines. A concrete floored shed with RR ties around the edge makes a fine shed, and sits within the Big Brother lines. It is also easier, as you just lag it down, and don't have to put the anchor bolts in precisely.
Next issue is the concrete. Where I live, one can get a mixer that tows behind a vehicle and holds 1.5 cu. yds. of concrete. At 81 sq. ft. per yd, that's about 120 SF. It runs about $150 for the rental AND the concrete, making it in my eyes anyway, a deal. Mixing that much concrete by hand or small mixer is a pain and you don't end up with as good a slab. Check around, and maybe you, like me, have one available, and just don't know about it.
Keep us posted.
Steve
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There are in some areas a truck that arrives with all the separate ingredients in different hoppers and mixes and dispenses it as needed. You pay only for what the meter says you took plus a delivery charge. No shortages nor overages to deal with.
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On Tue, 22 Jul 2008 21:49:09 +0100, "john westmore_______"

Put it on skids with a wood floor. Beats being taxed for it, you can easily move it if you decide you don't like where it is, and it is plenty good enough for a shed. I did this ten years ago, I've replaced the ramp once, but otehr than that it has been fine.
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