Installing Secure Lock in File Cabinet

My file cabinet is ordinary, four drawer, with a punched spot for installing a lock. I've never done it, so my first question is how to remove the metal where the lock will be installed.
Second question, is there a lock available (preferably on the Internet) that can be opened with a key but cannot be opened by locksmith? Want one that is pick-proof.
Thanks,
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I would think that most locksmiths their way into just about any lock that would fit in the blank for the drawer lock. Sounds like you might be in the security safe market, vs file cabinet.
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We can open those, too.
--

Christopher A. Young
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On Mon, 10 Oct 2005 19:27:08 +0000, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Can you pick a Medeco lock? Certainly anyone given time and interest can open any container, but can you *pick* the lock?
--
Keith



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says...

My "secure" file cabinets are surplus from classified-materials storage at a government contractor. Forget the pretty little cabinet lock, weld a steel strap hinge the full height of the cabinet, with a hasp on one of the front rails, so that the strap hinge blocks the front of every drawer. Even at that, you're still relying on a padlock that can be picked, cut, or bludgeoned off of the cabinet, so it's only one layer of a multi-layer protection for important documents.
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snipped-for-privacy@phred.org is Joshua Putnam
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I don't think a pick-proof lock exists. Where there is a will..., well you know the rest.

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Put a screwdriver on it near the edge and top with a hammer.

No. File cabinet lock are really pretty cheap. A good amateur can get one open and surely a locksmith can. If your material is that valuable, get a more secure setup like a safe. Of course, even a safe can be opened by a pro.
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one
one
I agree. Most file cabinet locks are easily defeated. I have gained access to several just by straightening a paperclip and put a bump at the end of it. Rake it across the pins in the lock with some rotational force on the lock tumbler and it opens sickeningly easily. I'm interested in knowing how a key lock can be pick-proof. Perhaps with some electronics installed like the GM resistance chip? I don't think it's possible to make a pick-proof lock that can be opened with a key.
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clipped

I didn't expect to find it, but thought I would ask :o) My next question would be re: a door lock. Touch-pad combinations (interior) easy to break?
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access
of
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like
Just what are you trying to keep secret? :^\\
Unless it is a solid-core or steel door, in a steel or reinforced hardwood frame, the only thing a combo lock protects against is a sneak thief. If someone is there after hours, a boot on the doorknob will shatter the frame/door, and open the door. A fancy lock will just attract their attention. I'd use a solid-core door with a thick jamb, and long screws holding it to the wall, and a commercial-grade deadbolt lock with a long throw. Maybe mount a 'Janitor' sign on the outside....
Is this a residential or office setting? Different tricks for different audiences.
aem sends...
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1) Hammer and screw driver. 2) No. I'm a locksmith with 20 years experience. The only pick proof file cabinet lock I've seen was a custom job in a factory dealing with confidential matters. And it wasn't anything you could get on the net.
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Norminn wrote:

You want something that the locksmith can't open! Don't bother. The cabinet is not all that secure, if you want in, you don't need to go though the lock.
I worked in a secure business. We had good commercial grade file cabinets. When it came time to replace them, each one had to be checked for data that might be remaining in them. We could not allow any to leave to office. I picked a few locks on those that were locked and decided that my time would be better spent just breaking into them. Much faster and easier. Of course I would guess someone with the right practiced skills could have picked them faster than I could.
I did find a number of confidential documents in those cabinets.

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Joseph Meehan

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clipped

Long time ago, worked in HR department. Confidentiality important, of course. Boss was a personal friend. She came in to use typewriter one day, make me and work buddy leave the room. Boss had already told us she was looking for other employment, so we thought that was likely what she needed the typewriter for. When she was done, being the curious children that we were then, I took the film ribbon out of the typewriter and read what she had typed. She walked back in whilst I was still holding the ribbon :o)
She was gone by the time our department Christmas party was held, at VP's home. Jovial atmosphere, talked about work/fun. Told the story about the type ribbon. It only took about a month before the whole department had computers :o) Another time, another boss. Boss would fill me in on things I didn't need to know, although I had access to personnel files, everyone's salaries, etc. Told me a VP got canned one Friday afternoon. We had no security guards at the time, and I had to open main door if exec's came back in after hours. The fired VP came in, had yelled at me once before for carding him, and I wasn't supposed to know he was "gone". He went back out in a few minutes, carrying a couple of large boxes. Eek! I had to call another VP at home, tell him mr so-and-so left with some boxes. He headed off the first guy, and probably got a speeding ticket on the way in. The place had full time security guards shortly after.
Another time, had taken ceramics for a hobby and worked at the store until stuff was fired. The owner used to get shredded computer paper from local companies to pack stuff in. One day unpacking stuff at home, I realized my knicknacks were packed in paper shredded the wrong direction - a computer printout of salaries for everyone at the local telephone company, people I knew. When I shred something really sensitive, I tear it up, run hot water in the sink, soak it for a few, and put it through the disposal :o)
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When I was 17 I worked for a company that was sold to ITT. A new Teletype machine was installed in the mailroom so a confidential report could be sent to HQ in NY every Friday. None of the executive secretaries knew how to use the Teletype, but I did and knew how to type. I was as low as possible on the totem pole, but sent the confidential report every week. My boss was also very nosey and stood over my shoulder much of the time.
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Norminn wrote:

...
I take my shred and mix it well then divide it up. Only one stack goes out at a time. My shredder cross cuts it. So it is unlikely anyone is going to be able to reconstruct much unless they collect several shipments in a row.
--
Joseph Meehan

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I put the shredded paper in the kitty litter box. If anyone wants it after that, they are welcome to try to read it.
Bob
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The higher the security, the higher the cost....
Here is a cabinet which can have a "Medeco" lock as an option... (Click on "High Security Lock Options" near bottom of page.) http://www.schwabcorp.com/Cabinets_Pages/schwab_fireproof_record_cabinet.htm
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Like the others have said, the internal locks on civilian-grade file cabinets are pretty much junk. At work (a DoD agency), before they fell for the modular furniture fad (which isn't lockable at all- 10 keys open all of them, but I digress), we had standard 4-up file cabinets fitted with external lock bars and big-ass shielded-dial 'GSA-standard' security combination padlocks. Real PITA to open, but secure against thieves w/o tools. (anybody who did office work in the military knows exactly the locks I am talking about.) You could cobble up some sort of lock bar with hardware store parts, if you don't mind ugly. Just make sure all the attachment points are through-bolted with big washers, not riveted or screwed, and make sure the lock bar covers the fasteners. A hardened bike padlock will be secure enough for most uses. Yeah, it can be opened, but not quietly or quickly, which makes the protection level 99.9% for most uses.
Here is a Google search link to a premade one. Definitely overpriced, but it is a niche market. Unless you have a machine shop, buying the stock to make just one would probably cost half the price they want for a pretty one. https://www.jmlock.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID51
aem sends...
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