installing connectors on RG-6?


Hi,
since it's not possible to work outside today (thanks Hanna!) I gathered up all the cable stuff I'd gathered in preparation to install a cable outlet in the living room. Before I got started I wanted to make sure that I'd be able to terminate the cable. Well, I can't - I'm missing some sort of trick I guess. I'm using Philips RG-6 quad shield, Philips weatherproof connectors (I bought those because I suspect that I will be running cable outside eventually) and the stripper that came with a cheap regular cable tool set. I can strip the cables OK but I can't seem to push the connectors onto the cable at all. I have tried both the Philips connectors and the generic connectors that came with the cheap tool set. It's like the little round tubular bit in the connector just won't slide under the braid in the cable. Any suggestions? IS there another tool that grips the cable and can force the connector on?
thanks
nate
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Unless you are planing to watch TV outside, there is no need for weatherproof connectors. They make twist-on indoor connectors that work fine if you put them on correctly.
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wrote:

I've used twist on connectors. Peel the braid back and spin/twist the round tubular thingy on under the braid. Then trim the braid. YMMV.
Do your connectors have internal threads? Might just need to turn them onto the cable.
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Are you using the right fittings? It sounds like you may have RG-59 fittings, which are smaller.
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G. Morgan wrote:

I'm using Philips RG6U quad cable, the spool is marked SDW5225GN/17. On the cable it is marked "#323600 CATV RG6U 75 OHM 2300MHz" The connectors are SDW1562GN/17, package is marked "RG6 quad shield compression connectors." They are smooth, no threads inside to twist them and draw themselves in.
http://www.p4c.philips.com/files/s/sdw5225gn_17/sdw5225gn_17_pss_aen.pdf http://www.p4c.philips.com/files/s/sdw5162gn_17/sdw5162gn_17_pss_aen.pdf
I don't know what the other connectors are that I tried, but I had the same problem with them.
nate
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wrote:

http://www.sjgreatdeals.com/jasav23259.html
These are the twist on type. The braiding actually makes contact with the metal ring inside the connector.
The connector itself grabs the insulation.
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I used to use twist on connectors, but none are approved by any cable company, as they loosen up and short out to easily. The only approved connectors are compression type, which is not to be confused with crimping connectors. All of this has nothing to do with your particular problem, which is that "quad shield" uses a different connector than dual or triple shield. The garden variety of screw on connector is probably for dual shield . You can probably get it on if you cut one layer of shield off, but then we'll have to call you Rube
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RBM wrote:

Exactly, twist on connectors are what you use if you you don't like doing an install and forget job the first time. As you noted snap seals are standard practice for cable companies and they aren't noted for applying extra effort but they know what it costs to repair bad connections.
They don't short out but typically develop poor connections. A good example is where my neighbor works. He has been managing the facilities of a local company that has a bunch of stores, mini marts and gas stations. Prior to him they had installed camera and recorder systems. All the equipment was good stuff except someone cut corners by using the twist on connectors. Some of the locations had 30 cameras. His staff was constantly responding to failed camera reports which always turned out to be a twist on connector that developed a poor connection just through thermal cycling. He hired a wiring contractor to just go through each location and replace the twist ons with snap seals. The ironic part is that the snap seals are less expensive than the twist on connectors. You can practically tow a car with a snap seal because of how well they grip the cable.
Along the same lines we had a lot of network issues at a location that had fiber between the buildings and couldn't figure out what it was. Suspecting bad terminations we hired someone to come in and they found that although the connectors looked the same someone had cut corners and used some "easy to use" type that were held in place by a crimp. So whenever there were temperature swings the glass moved enough to degrade the connection. Standard connectors use a tiny drop of epoxy which prevent that and are actually cheaper.
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There is a tool that makes it real easy to slide on the connectors it sort of expands the shield and separates it from the center insulator. I use one and have no problems. It also helps, if after stripping the coax, if there is any braid sticking out, to bend it back over the outer insulation before putting the connector on.
http://www.techtoolsupply.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID !4
-dickm
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Thank you! that looks like that might help a bit. I'll have to check and see if I can pick one of those up locally, if not, thanks for the link.
Additionally, I was just looking at the links I posted in my last post.
http://www.p4c.philips.com/files/s/sdw5225gn_17/sdw5225gn_17_pss_aen.pdf http://www.p4c.philips.com/files/s/sdw5162gn_17/sdw5162gn_17_pss_aen.pdf
It looks like the pic of the cable with the assembled connectors has some kind of plastic seal at the back of the connector. Neither the connectors that came with the installation tool or the ones that I bought separately (which appear to be exactly the same) have this seal. Did I buy the wrong connectors?
thanks
nate
dicko wrote:

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The connectors in the links are compression type. It sounds like you have crimp type
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RBM wrote:

actually the connectors in the links and the connectors I bought have the same part number. I didn't realize until you pointed it out that the picture of the connector was different than what I have. Maybe they've improved the design? I dunno. I bought all this stuff at Lowe's as the real supply house only keeps normal business hours, don't know how quick it turns over there.
nate
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I would think that Phillips doesnt actually make the connector. They just sell what they can buy and repackage cheaply and the supplier may change from manufacturing lot to lot. So I wouldnt lose any sleep over whether the picture doesnt match with what you bought.
The important thing is that what you bought is still a compression connector instead of a crimp on. That blue plastic on the connector acts as a water tight seal when the connector is actually compressed onto the cable and it then appears as your link shows it in the picture of the installed connector.
BTW, I'd look at buy other types of connectors. Thomas and Betts Snap & Seal connectors are probably the most popular. You can find them rather cheap on Ebay and will probably fit the tool you bought.
-dickm
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Is this the tool you bought:
http://www.consumer.philips.com/consumer/en/us/consumer/cc/_productid_SDW5061O_17_US_CONSUMER/Digital-compression-tool+SDW5061O-17
It seems to be the "digital compression tool" they refer to on the connector description.
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George wrote:

http://www.consumer.philips.com/consumer/en/us/consumer/cc/_productid_SDW5061O_17_US_CONSUMER/Digital-compression-tool+SDW5061O-17

It is indeed. It only sets the connector though, it doesn't grip the cable at all.
nate
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Once you use the stripping tool and peal back the shielding, you should be able to slip the fitting down the cable until the core wire is sticking through the front. Then you insert the fitting with cable attached into the tool and compress the butt end into the fitting. I'm wondering if your stripping tool isn't working properly
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RBM wrote:

It appears to be and I unsderstand what you're saying, but the f-connector won't slide more than 1/8" or so onto the cable. I think I do need that "flaring tool" that someone else posted but I can't tell whether HD or Lowe's sell it so I may not be able to get back to this for a couple weeks unless I find myself with some free time during the day some day to go to the real supply house.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

All right, I am so frustrated I could just spit...
Ordered a "flaring tool" online as I was unable to find one locally. It doesn't help at all... I can't get it between the dielectric and the braid of this cable at all. In fact, when I attempt to force it, it just pushes the dielectric down into the cable assembly so if I've stripped, say, 1/4" of the center wire and then another 1/4" off the jacket, I end up with 1/2" of the center wire sticking out and I still can't insert the connector. Could someone who has done this before PLEASE post exact mfgrs. part numbers of a cable, connector, installation tool, and flaring tool (if required) with which they have successfully been able to install connectors on the end of an RG-6U quad shield cable. Where to purchase would also be very helpful. I've been tripping over this run of cable going up the basement stairs for almost two years now and I STILL have not found anything that will allow me to properly cut and terminate cable so that I can run it within the walls.
Thanks...
nate
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Sounds like you're having all kinds of fun...
It might be a little late, but I'd recommend using a full set of compatible connectors and tools. Having spent time working for a cable company, I can tell you that the connector quality matters as does compatibility with the tooling, and some connectors that look the same do require different tools for proper termination.
I also know nothing of the quality of the "Phillips" coax other than it is most likely made by someone else. The braid should pull back from the foil wrapped foam dielectric easily, if it doesn't the cable may be faulty.
Also remember that coax is RF cable and kinks, tight bends and crush points have a very significant effect on the RF signal, especially at the higher frequencies.
From the Lowe's site:
IDEAL 3-Piece Installers Compression Kit ($40)
Item #: 251912 Model: 33-623
Contains compression tool, cable stripper and Data-T Cutter in hip pouch
and
IDEAL RG-6 Quad Compression Connector ($30)
Item #: 44578 Model: 89-056
Approved for use by most cable TV and satellite companies 50-pack jar RF signal containment ensures strong signal One-piece design for quick installation
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