install outlet on exterior stucco wall

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I like to install an outlet on an exterior stucco wall so that I can put in a fountain. The other side of this same wall is in my garage. There is an existing outlet in the garage right where I plan to install the new outlet, but the existing outlet is about 3' higher than where I plan to install the new outlet outside.
1. Should I cut an opening on the inside wall right where the new exterior outlet will be, and do I need to install an J box here? 2. How do I drill through the stucco wall? With a drill bit?
Thanks
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If you have a small carbide bit, 3/16", and a hammer drill, you should be able to trace the outline of a "cut in gem box", onto the stucco, then carefully drill holes along the lines about 1/4" apart. Then break out the material. You'll next have to cut through the plywood or whatever sheeting you have, to fit the box. Once that's done, you can easily snake from the box on the inside to the large opening on the outside and install the cable, box, gfci outlet, and in use cover
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RBM wrote:

Hi, Or for lesser work you can install a surface mount weather [proof box. Better have GFCI outlet.
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He could do that if he went straight through a knockout in the back of the inside box, through the stucco and into a rain-tight box, but he wants to be below the inside box, which makes it a little more difficult
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..
Yes, I like the outside box to be lower than the one inside. So I really have to snake the wire down from the inside box, create an opening on the inside wall at the level where the outside box will be installed, drill a hole through the stucco through this opening, and install an outside GFI protected outlet box. Then I have to patch up the inside opening. Does this sound right?
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Yes, I like the outside box to be lower than the one inside. So I really have to snake the wire down from the inside box, create an opening on the inside wall at the level where the outside box will be installed, drill a hole through the stucco through this opening, and install an outside GFI protected outlet box. Then I have to patch up the inside opening. Does this sound right?
That's fine, depending upon which knockout in the inside box, your going to use, you may be able to snake it without cutting a work hole under the box
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But if I create the opening on the outside, then I need to be really accurate in my positioning. Otherwise I risk creating an outside opening which misses the cable when I snake it down from the inside outlet. The other alternative is to create the opening on the inside, grab the wire that is snaked down from the interior outlet, create an exterior opening in the stucco, install the exterior outlet box with the cable, patch up the inside opening. Please advise if what I am suggesting makes sense.
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But if I create the opening on the outside, then I need to be really accurate in my positioning. Otherwise I risk creating an outside opening which misses the cable when I snake it down from the inside outlet. The other alternative is to create the opening on the inside, grab the wire that is snaked down from the interior outlet, create an exterior opening in the stucco, install the exterior outlet box with the cable, patch up the inside opening. Please advise if what I am suggesting makes sense.
What you are suggesting makes perfect sense, and what I'm suggesting is quite a bit more work. Typically the box on the inside will be mounted to a stud. You pretty much just have to be close to that location on the outside, and on the same side of that stud
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.
It sounds like the interior garage wall is finished. Is that correct?? You should be able to measure carefully and go from the inside to the outside within 1/2 inch accuracy if you know how to measure carefully and use a 4' carpenter's level. I you have any doubts, use a long drill and drill a small hole in what you expect to be the center of the new outside box, when you go thru the inside wall of the garage, then you will have a measuring point from which all other measurements are made.
YUou really need to tell us what the outside stucco wall is made of, and if the inside finished wall is on studs, screwed into concrete block outside wall, or whatever. You could get much better answers if you gave more details in the original post.
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wrote:

...
I just removed the outlet cover for the outlet inside the garage. The outlet box is screw onto a wood stud on one side. The wall in the garage is finished. I cannot see what is on the inside of the stucco wall without creating a new opening below the inside outlet box. But one thing I am sure of is that there is no concrete block inside the wall. This is purely a wood and stucco home in Southern CA. So is it likely that the stucco is applied onto a plywood sheet? Can I use a wood drill bit to drill through stucco?
Thanks
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om...
By the way, the inside outlet box does not have a breakout on the bottom surface. It is one of those plastic outlet boxes. Do I just just a drill bit to open a hole at the bottom surface of the outlet box and snake the wire through it?
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By the way, the inside outlet box does not have a breakout on the bottom surface. It is one of those plastic outlet boxes. Do I just just a drill bit to open a hole at the bottom surface of the outlet box and snake the wire through it?
If it's an old bakelite box, the knockouts are not apparent from the inside of the box. If you hit the area with a screwdriver, it should pop a hole through it
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.com...
Since it appears you will be able to get the wire connected between the two boxes, I would start by figuring out what the external wall is made of. I would drill a hole in the outside wall where the box is to be located and then use a scroll saw to enllarge the hole. You should be abler to get your hand inside a hole that is big enough for the outside box. You can get a box that will mount on the stucco wall using various tabs and projections. Go to you local large hardware store and get someone to help you to find a box that will fit your needs. Until you know what the thickness and composition of the external wall is, we can't tell you much more. Don't you have someone in your neighborhood who is handy? This is really a simple project. Just be sure that your external box has a GFCI outlet and a weatherproof cover. You may be able to use a regular outlet if the garage outlet is already gfci protected.
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wrote:

ps.com...
Is there any building code that stipulates how high the external outlet box should be from dirt?
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On Fri, 9 Apr 2010 11:11:57 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com"

less than 6' 6" if you want it to count as one of the required outside receptacles.
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But if I create the opening on the outside, then I need to be really accurate in my positioning. Otherwise I risk creating an outside opening which misses the cable when I snake it down from the inside outlet. The other alternative is to create the opening on the inside, grab the wire that is snaked down from the interior outlet, create an exterior opening in the stucco, install the exterior outlet box with the cable, patch up the inside opening. Please advise if what I am suggesting makes sense.
Cut the inside wall for a box opening that matches where the outlet will be outside. Snake wire to that point. Cut outside wall. Install box. Put GFI in the place of the origanal outlet. Wire up outside box. Cover inside opening with a blank cover. You may need to put a shallow box inside to attach the cover to. WW
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.
You are making this too complicated. Just measure from a common point, such as the corner of a window to get the inside and outside measurements. Don't you have a 25' tape measure and a level????
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Thanks everyone for all your input. They have been invaluable. I finished snaking the wire through the exterior wall from the inside outlet. I did this by creating an interior opening right where I had the exterior hole so that I can use this opening to push the wire through the exterior hole. This helps me to minimize the size of the exterior hole. I will cover up the interior opening using a blank cover. Should I use drywall patch compound to patch up the interior opening first before installing a blank cover? The opening is about 2.5" x 2".
Now I just need to go and purchase an outdoor outlet box with GFI outlets and attach it to the stucco wall. How do I screw the outlet box to stucco? Are there special screws that I need to use? Should I use plastic wall anchors?
Thanks
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*Go ahead and patch the wall using the drywall piece that you cut out. No need to put a blank cover over it after it is patched, sanded and painted.
If you located the wire next to a stud you can slide the box over so part of it is over the stud. Drill two holes in the back of the box so that you can screw it to the stud. You may have to drill pilot holes through the stucco for the wood or sheet metals screws to catch the wood stud. Use a masonry bit for drilling through the stucco.
If you are not located close to a wood stud, you can use plastic anchors and sheet metal screws. Use the correct size masonry bit for the anchors. A 1/4" bit is used for #10-12 anchors.
Put duct seal in the hole behind the box where the wire comes through to prevent air from leaking inside. Caulk around the top and two sides of the box after you mount it. Do not caulk the bottom. Lately I have been using GE Silicone 2 Gutter and Flashing caulk. It remains very pliable after it cures, but it is not paintable.
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Make sure you miss any studs. Should be able to locate with stud finder if interior walls are covered. WW

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