Inground Pool rebuild

Background: Finally decided to get the vinyl liner replaced. Looks like it's OEM and about 15 years old. Estimate for the liner replace, moving one ladder and adding a handrail next tothe steps comes to almost $4K. The coping is made of tubular aluminum, about 2.5 - 3.0 " in diameter and painted white but with a slightly rough finish. I'm told it sits atop and is attached to the metal walls. It is installed prior to the concrete deck being poured and concrete is then flowed into the open back side of this coping. The finish (paint) is worn off in some places and is chaulky almost everywhere else.
Now the big question. How do I refinish this coping, in place? I know, I know, I can have it all removed and replaced with tile bull nose or some such for about $4K more. I just want to get it back to its original condition for the next 15 years.
Suggestions to discuss this with a pool company or my local H-D paint "specialist" are not useful.
Kincher...any ideas?
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Craven Morehead wrote:

My wife repainted our white aluminum coping with white Rustoleum spray paint.
--
Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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I'm the OP.
Thanks for the replies so far. Perhaps my requirement for 15 year life was too much a fantasy.
I just located the original installer. He suggests cleaning with TSP (or equivalent), then using Rustoleum flat white w/ a bit of sand added for texture. Apply w/ a brush.
BTW, Richard...I enjoy your site. Thanks for sharing.

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Craven Morehead writes:

Aluminum is about the toughest thing to coat, because stuff won't stick to oxidized aluminum, which is to say, the surface of any aluminum in the earthly atmosphere.
You have a big job ahead if you want something that will last.
You must first remove all that old coating and sand the bare metal.
I would then consider a costly polyurethane marine paint system. By system I mean you have primers specifically for aluminum as well as finish coats. For example, the Valspar marine polyurethane enamel (which Home Depot sells, or used to, as it has been recently on clearance here) starts with a vinyl wash primer with reducer, followed by vinyl zinc chromate primer in two coats, followed by two to four coats (!) of the finish enamel.
Polyurethane will stand up to pool chemistry.
Epoxy is another candidate, but that's even more work.
15 years is optimistic for any polymer exposed to pool chemistry and weather.
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On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 13:59:42 -0400, "Craven Morehead"

I put my pool in a little over 30 years ago and basically it sounds like your pool is a copy of mine.. I have repainted the aluminum coping a couple of times over those 30 years...its not much of a job...and I did it when I replaced the liner about every 10-15 years...
I roughed up the coping with wet/dry sandpaper before for I removed the water and old liner... 1st time I painted the copping with spray paint from inside the pool (the floating painter).. I also tried to paint the copping after I had removed the old liner and found it was harder to paint that way.
BTW No way will I pay "much" to install a liner ..just too easy to do and it only takes a couple of hours of work at most...the rest of the day is spent waiting for the tanker trucks to haul in the water (7 truckloads) ..
Lots of luck... But to be honest I have had my pool for over 30 years and I am not fussy trying to make it look brand new... on a Hot day, and after 3-4 Bloddy Mary's and it looks (and feels) just fine...
Bob G.
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