IF green means acetylene, why is Bernzomatic selling propane in dark green?

IF green means acetylene, why is Bernzomatic selling propane in dark green?
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Green does not mean acetylene. From my supplier, it is orange and oxygen, nitrogen, argon are all green as are some others.
I could not find a definitive color for industrial gas chart, but did find this from Air Products http://www.airproducts.com/NR/rdonlyres/7CCE748B-35BA-45B2-93D4-48AE3D3EEDF3/0/reference_cylinder_information.pdf
. Virtually all steel cylinder bodies are painted uniformly dark blue and covered with a protective plastic diamond mesh. . A cylinder neck ring is permanently fixed below the base of the valve. Each cylinder neck ring is color-coded to help identify cylinder contents and gas category (e.g., yellow for corrosive, red for flammables). . A color-coded shoulder label indicates the product's shipping name and identification number. On pure products, a grade label is also applied to the cylinder shoulder. The color-coded label border correlates with neck ring color for product identification. The shoulder label also specifies gas grade information. . Some cylinders are painted with a vertical stencil identifying cylinder contents
Medical cylinders will be color coded http://weldingdesign.com/gases/news/gwd_18131 /
Table 1 - Standard names and identifying container colors for medical gases
Standard Name
Standard Color
Medical Air
Yellow
Medical Carbon Dioxide
Gray
Medical Helium
Brown
Medical Nitrogen
Black
Medical Nitrous Oxide
Blue
Medical Oxygen
Green
Mixture or blend of medical gases
Standard colors for each component
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

http://www.airproducts.com/NR/rdonlyres/7CCE748B-35BA-45B2-93D4-48AE3D3EEDF3/0/reference_cylinder_information.pdf
Outside of medical, there is no standard color code for gas cylinders. Different companies use different colors and even the same company uses different colors. I've had Argon cylinders in teal, maroon, brown and black all the same size and all from the same company.
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wrote:

They deal with safety by the connection into the valves. There are well over a dozen CGA standards for the connection to cylinders, each for a classes of gasses. It is pretty hard to connect up the wrong bottle.
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On Tue, 22 Feb 2011 00:40:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Oops. I don't know where I got that idea. Thanks for your chart.

Wow.

Good.
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Green DOES NOT mean acetylene.
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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On Tue, 22 Feb 2011 22:00:30 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

OTOH< look at your post just before his, that reminds me about the Muppet investment in bottled gas.
Knowing I'm wrong is useful.

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My bottle of acetylene is black, Oxygen is green.
Jimmie
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On Tue, 22 Feb 2011 18:02:59 -0800 (PST), JIMMIE

I think my oxygen is red. Oh well. Thank goodness my parents sent me some place where they taught me to read. I guess it will finally come in handy with these gases.

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