I got a problem:(

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On 3/12/2012 8:33 AM, Robert Macy wrote:

You know ants won't touch Diet Coke because it contains no sugar but I had a Coca-Cola delivery truck driver tell me that rats love the diet soft drink. I suppose the company must have tested it on rats. ^_^
TDD
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Rodents also love the taste of warfarin/coumadin, the main active ingredient in rat poison. Because it makes them bleed into their lungs, they run outside to gasp for air and die (I'm told). Of course, warfarin is the main medication against thrombosis via its inhibition of blood clotting.
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Best regards
Han
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On 3/12/2012 9:48 AM, Han wrote:

It's amazing how many poisons are used in medicine. Botox is one that comes to mind. o_O
TDD
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Yes, it's the dose that does it. A little salt is flavoring, a lot and you're pickled ...
--
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Han
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Han wrote:

Not true. Controlled studies (with volunteers from prisons) have been fed up to 25 grams of salt per day with no adverse effects - excess salt is simply excreted.
Salt does not CAUSE hypertension, it only exacerbates an existing condition. Six percent of the population suffers from hypertension and, of those, half have the kind that's made worse by excessive salt. For the 97% of the remaining population, enjoy as much salt as you like.
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Isn't 25 grams less than 1 ounce? I was talking about a lot, like kilos. I wouldn't want to eat that much ...
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Han
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Han wrote:

Oh, yeah. Sorry, I misunderstood. I often try to debunk the FDA's hysteria that anything over 1 gram (based on NO empirical studies) is bad. Really bad.
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On 3/12/2012 1:09 PM, Han wrote:

One of my baby sisters is a nurse and I know at one time she worked in neonatal intensive care on the little critters. Being a science geek I've always had an interest in medicine and I remember a story about physicians using Viagra on a newborn to bring down the infant's blood pressure, I don't remember if there were other effects but I thought it was interesting enough for the kid to have something to brag about when he grows up. ^_^
TDD
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I've had some experience killing rats using the green warfarin blocks. You don't have to do anything special, just put them where the rats might go, like, in my case, near the garbage. They eat it alright and then go outside, maybe for air, I don't know, but they certainly don't stay indoors. Apparently it's a pretty horrible death (effectively suffocation) and the reason it works well for rats is that they can't vomit. It goes down and they can't get it up. That's also the reason why it's not too dangerous for people and pets who'll vomit if they ingest any serious amount. Same goes for children although I wouldn't like to test it on my grand kids. On second thoughts...
In my case the rats got into my garbage room and tore holes in the black plastic bags which in turn was because I thought I was being smart when I drilled large (1") holes around the base of my garbage cans so that the air pressure wouldn't prevent a new bag from hugging the walls of the can. After ingesting the warfarin the rats (I had about 4 over a couple of days) left the scene of the crime and died in the street outside a nearby apartment building from where they probably came in the first place. The janitor commented to me about their horrible death but I just pretended ignorance.
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On Mon, 12 Mar 2012 06:33:07 -0700 (PDT), Robert Macy

Here's a method used on farms. Place a 5 gallon bucket half filled with water, where the rats run along the walls. Float some whole oats on top of the water. Put a ramp such as a piece of 2x4 to the top of the pail and secure it so it dont fall off (a couple nails that go into the pail should do). The rat will go up the board, and jump in to get the oats. Then it drowns. This does work. Rats often drown in livestock watering tanks on farms. The oats (or any other feed that will float), encourages them to enter.
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Victor traps, new each use, peanut butter, out of pet reach. Use 2, 3, or even 4 plastic shopping bags to discard.Don't forget, as the temperature of the rat's body drops, fleas abandon, and yep into your dog....and you.
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On 3/12/2012 8:35 AM, Robert Macy wrote:

I once tried to get rid of pests in a warehouse/office I had and the rats/mice ate the ant bait and the ants ate the peanut butter off the rat/mouse traps. The funniest thing you will ever see is a mouse caught in a rat trap, the look on the lifeless face of the mouse is frozen in a horrible grimace because the bar of the big trap has crushed the little rodent's ass. o_O
TDD
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wrote:

-> kitchen with the dogs food and water.......

<<Victor traps, new each use, peanut butter, out of pet reach. Use 2, 3, or even 4 plastic shopping bags to discard.Don't forget, as the temperature of the rat's body drops, fleas abandon, and yep into your dog....and you.>>
Very good points. I would bait the traps with whatever they're eating now, like the dog food. That means keeping the dog out of the areas where the traps are set (duh!) and monitoring them often to try to mitigate the flea hopping problem. I used my X-10 motion detector to alert me when the squirrel that was loose entered the Hav-a-hart trap. Not sure if rats will trigger it although I know that birds do. They constantly fly in and out of the trap when it's outside, eating all the peanut butter.
Collecting the dead rats when they're warm is the only way to avoid the flea issue. I would never use poison on anything larger than a mouse in a home setting. They'll stink God-awful bad if they crawl into some inaccessible cavity to die. Set the traps along the walls where you suspect rat activity. Pellets should be easy to see if the problem is more than one or two rats. Black light may or may not reveal urine stains. Lots of different types of UV lights, not all of them are right for the job.
-- Bobby G.
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Once in the 100 year old home, leaky like a sieve, there was an 'abrupt' infestation of 12 rats! The last one must have been the tough old grizzled patriarch. That trap snapped squarely on its neck and only made it angry! It simply had 'difficulty' navigating with its new necklace. At least until I used the 5 lb sledge on it.
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On 3/13/2012 11:18 AM, Robert Macy wrote:

Are you sure it wasn't a Chihuahua? ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

I had two in the house once. I used rat poison, which works by causing them to lose the ability to regulate their body heat. So they seek out warm places and die. Like behind the furnace and over the firebox in the fireplace. I had to knock 2 bricks out of the mantel. Don't use poison inside.
More recently I had another one. This time I used a Safer trap baited with peanut butter and oatmeal. It took 2 nights, but I got him.
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The OP did not say how many rat traps he had set.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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wrote:

We had them too.
First thing is figure out how they are getting in. In our case it was a soffit screen. Plug up all the holes. Then TRAP them out, don't use poison.
I have had decent luck with glue traps but the most effective was this live trap. I had exactly zero luck with the big Victor traps. They either got the bait without tripping the trap or they tripped it and still got away.
http://gfretwell.com/wildlife/rattus%20rattus.jpg
We had roof rats, not the bigger Norways and they can go anywhere a squirrel can go, maybe even places a squirrel can't go. If you are out in the country fleas and mites are probably a worse problem than disease. Squirrels and rats are about the same thing.
Inside your house, the idea of keeping food away from them is useless. They will find something to eat if they have to chew a hole in a cabinet and eat into a box. You have to tighten up the perimeter and keep them out.
A rat is far more likely to chew a hole to get out than to get in tho.
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wrote:

Thread will work, too, but peanut butter makes some damn fine "glue" for nuts, pieces of old lunch meat, etc. without futzing with threads. But you're right - anything that prevents them from taking a flying leap at the bait will work. I've caught a number of mice alive by the ends of their tails. They squeak like you wouldn't believe when they're caught that way. I found one of the "tail trapped" mice had dragged the trap several feet to his escape hole. I was surprised he didn't try to bite his tail off to escape. I actually took him and released him outside as a reward for his Herculean efforts. Most of the others have a look of surprise on their face when the trap hits them squarely across the neck.
Haven't seen mice in years since we got a Jack Russell Terrier and a Rat Terrier. The JRT should be renamed Jack Squirrel Hater because that's what she lives for and she's fast enough to catch them every now and then in the backyard off the leash. Goes right for the neck. She only got bloodied the first time she went after one. Now she's an expert and quick executioner. JRT's have been clocked killing over 200 rats per hour in severely infested barns. Grab at the neck, shake really hard with powerful shoulder and neck muscles and then it's on to the next victim. A cat would bat them around for hours.
The squirrels hate her and throw down all sorts of stuff from the trees when she's loose in the backyard. I just saw on Nature that zoologists believe that elephants kill lion cubs because lions sometimes kill elephant calves. It's strictly a revenge thing because, of course, they're vegetarians. Vengeful vegetarians. Huge vengeful vegetarians. (-:
I think this warm winter is going to result in some serious critter problems. I've already seen stink bugs, bats, carpenter bees and all sorts of winged and crawling bugs about. Today I saw a pretty big robin yanking an earthworm out of the ground that was so big it looked like a small snake. I went over to check and the robin hopped a way a few feet, waiting patiently until I walked away and then grabbing that sucker and flying off with it.
-- Bobby G.
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On Tue, 13 Mar 2012 04:54:49 -0400, "Robert Green"

I had a roof rat with his tail stuck on a glue trap, the glue trap grabbed the dog bowl and the dog was chasing them around the living room until the rat ran under a table that caught the bowl and I shot him.
My best shot was hitting one on a dead run. Rolled his ass with one shot. All of that skeet shooting paid off.
Rat shot in my Colt Frontier Scout seems to be the right tool for the job. One reason the live trap works so well is you don't have that "dead rat fleas" problem. Take them outside alive and let them assume room temperature out there. I toss them in the river for the alligators.
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