How to test a wall thermostat to see if it's actually working?

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On 12/14/2013 8:55 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The contractor grade HVAC systems are made as cheaply as possible and often lack all the bells and whistles of the more expensive units. I've added anti short cycle timers, surge arresters, low pressure switches and high pressure manual reset switches. The low pressure switch cuts the control circuit power if the freon leaks out to protect the compressor and the high pressure switch cuts control voltage if the high side pressure goes too high like when the condenser fan fails or if the condenser coil becomes obstructed because it's clogged with dirt, animal hair or trash that gets sucked up against it. The expensive units usually have everything except the surge arresters which I add to the AC systems in rural areas because they are more likely to get power surges. The AC system compressors have an internal automatic overload which pops if the the compressor gets too hot or draws too much current because of a locked rotor due to high pressure from the compressor being stopped or slammed on and off by power blinks or someone playing with the thermostat. With the anti short cycle timer, the system won't cut on and off with power blinks or thermostat fiddling because every time the control voltages goes off, the timer keeps the contactor from pulling in until 3 to 5 minutes pass. I use the adjustable timers but potted preset timer modules are also available with a 5 minute delay. On all of the commercial AC condensers, I will also add a fan cycle control because the AC systems are often run in the middle of winter. When the high side pressure drops too low, the system will not operate properly because there is no proper pressure differential. The fan control will not turn on the condenser fan until the high side comes up to a proper pressure. You will see the condenser fan turn on and off as the high side pressure goes up and down. In very cold weather and a slight breeze, the compressor is happy without the condenser fan ever coming on. ^_^
TDD
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On 12/13/2013 11:12 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote: You could install a thermostat inside the return air duct but

Best advice I've heard in years. I remember Earl Proulx (the Yankee Handyman) did that. I read in his book, a couple decades ago. I've long since misplaced the book. He put the working Tstat behind the sofa on the baseboard.
When my sister and her boyfriend lived in a house, we discussed run a second Tstat wire. The guy next door had the stat, and he'd turn it way down before going to work. They asked him many times not to do that, but to no avail.
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When I first got out of college we sublet the bottom floor of an old house from the people living upstairs. They were paying the heat bills but the t'stat was downstairs in our apartment. They didn't like the heating bills but it was on *old* house.
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On Fri, 13 Dec 2013 17:52:00 -0800, Oren wrote:

You guys have always come through for me, whenever I was in a puddle.

Just to be clear, the door itself didn't solve the problem because the blower was running constantly. But when I reassembled the thermostat, the blower stopped; but the furnace wouldn't go on.
After tapping everything, and blowing it all out with compressed air, the blower went on, but only for a very short time.
And, after disassembling all wires (one at a time), cleaning each of them, and tapping on all relays & switches, the blower started working like it should.
So, it wasn't *just* the blower door (although, I do agree, that was a "duh" moment for me when I saw that!).


I just wrote an entire review for free Android offline GPS mapping applications in comp.mobile.android. I tested about two dozen, and chose the best two or three for vehicle and hiking navigation without a data plan (or when you're out of the service area). https://groups.google.com/forum /#!topic/comp.mobile.android/AoE0Ox2We58
I'm currently spec'ing out a WiFi extension that will cover the entire house with an entire Watt (the legal limit in the USA) EIRP. That's over in alt.internet.wireless https://groups.google.com/forum /#!topic/alt.internet.wireless/fMLTzEHlzE8
We had a loooong discussion on how to get Android to tell the truth about system memory in alt.cellular.t-mobile https://groups.google.com/forum /#!topic/alt.cellular.t-mobile/e6svmGS1M-E[1-25-false]
etc.
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I would wager that all of the knocking and stuff was not necessary.
T-stat, reset all limits, and replace access cover. You really do need to ask "first". :-)
Though, doing a once over every year is a good thing. Now, you have some experience.
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On Sat, 14 Dec 2013 00:16:04 -0600, Irreverent Maximus wrote:

Well, I *did* ask, once I saw what the thermostat looked like unscrewed! :)

I think, for me, this was the biggest bonus. For you guys, somehow, inherently, you knew the red goes to the white, but, to me, I didn't know that.
Also, I didn't know about the limit switch, fuse, countdown timer, etc., and I didn't realize there was even a 120V plug in the wall for the heater.
Plus, I didn't really know how the thermostat worked (we almost never need heat or A/C where I live anyway).
So, for me, it was a tremendous learning experience. Now, when I look at the heater with the doors off, all the parts at least make sense.
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On Sat, 14 Dec 2013 14:52:11 -0800, Oren wrote:

Heh heh ... I've got a microwave that needs a new "something", and all I know is that it's not the diode. :)
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Danny D'Amico wrote:

Then time to chuck it. Instead of trying to deal with HV x-former or magnetron, buying new one is wiser idea, IMO. Some times it's control touch panel(not cheap) or interlock switch problem.
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On Sat, 14 Dec 2013 17:17:40 -0700, Tony Hwang wrote:

Understood. The problem is the size of the darn thing has to be just about right in order to fit above the oven. Sigh. And black too.
BTW, I *am* dealing with microwaves in a different way, as today I was trying to get my rooftop antenna to connect to a Starbucks twenty miles away. I failed, but here's my signal strength to a nearby antenna only 3 miles away:
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3790/11375313475_125699bec3_o.jpg
PS: I'm a frustrated latent wannabe war driver! :)
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On Sat, 14 Dec 2013 14:31:53 -0800, Oren wrote:

Well, I might fall off the roof working with this damn microwave antenna!
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