How to minimize voltage drop caused by heavy machine?

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On 27/01/2015 18:46, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Once the saw starts, it drops for a split of a second to around 185 V before coming back to 205 V till the saw stops. Then, the voltage goes up to 210V.
I also measure the voltage at the service entrance. It is 214~215 v. There is also a 5V drop when the saw is running.
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On Wednesday, January 28, 2015 at 3:07:12 AM UTC-5, yyy378 wrote:

5 volt drop at the service due to an 8 amp load doesn't sound good..... IDK what the service rating is, but extrapolating that, if the service was rated at 100A and you pulled that, you'd have ~60V drop.
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On 1/28/2015 3:06 AM, yyy378 wrote:

That is a pretty good drop with just one piece of equipment Given your location, it is quite possible the service is just plain inadequate right back to the power station and nothing you do will fix it.
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Is it possible that the UPS feeding the scanner is defective?
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On 27/01/2015 20:44, CRNG wrote:

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On 01/26/2015 08:42 PM, yyy378 wrote:

The UPS is evidently only "consumer grade".
You'd be better off with a Ferroresonant transformer type UPS.
It will not cut out at all and in a worst case scenario just drop by a couple of volts...but more importantly...zero interruption.
They are of course more expensive.
It may be better to just find a completely separate circuit for the saw
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Best.
I say again, use an on-line ups. It outputs near sine wave. Input power never sees the output. Sounds like a similar price to a ferro xfmr.
And NO, not two ups in series.
How much does scanner cost ?
Greg
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On 01/28/2015 02:05 AM, gregz wrote:

Just though of something I did once and it worked.
I put a ferroresonant line conditioner transformer between a cheap UPS and the load and it worked fine.
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wrote:

If this is a wall wart supply, the capacitor trick is easy. Get a male cord and female connector the right size and just plug the capacitor in across the line.
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On 1/27/2015 12:34 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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Another thought, assuming the UPS unit or units are working properly, is to cut the power to the UPS while the scanner operates, let the UPS carry the load for a few seconds, and switch the power back on when the scanner is done. That way the saw, whatever it's doing, can't affect anything on the plug strip.
TK
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On Monday, January 26, 2015 at 9:42:53 PM UTC-5, yyy378 wrote:

Back in the 1970s I worked as coiper service tech. Our buildings wiring was ancient and undersized. copies either came out too light or way too dark depending on the line volatege at the time of the copiers use
my work around was to set the exposure lamp as brite as possible, then the key operator could use a high wattage dimmer to darken the copies as needed......
it worked well for a couple years till the building was demolished for a highway project
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then what happened?
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my work around was to set the exposure lamp as brite as possible, then the key operator could use a high wattage dimmer to darken the copies as needed......
it worked well for a couple years till the building was demolished for a highway project
I will add the state demolished the building but never used the land, today its a parking lot. which is kinda sad
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On Monday, January 26, 2015 at 7:42:53 PM UTC-7, yyy378 wrote:

voltage drop? Because if it's just line noise you may be able to fix the problem by plugging the scanner into a surge protector containing a line filter made of both inductors and capacitors. Many surge protectors lack one, as do even some backup power supplies. For example, I had a cheap 350VA Belkin backup with no such filter in it, and the computer would freeze or reboot when a laser printer plugged into the same AC outlet was turned on, but the computer always ran fine when I instead plugged it into an old APC backup. Or maybe you just need to try a different AC adapter for the scanner (be sure it puts out the same voltage and at least as much current and that its plug is of the correct polarity) because some of those adapters contain better line filters than others do. If none of that helps, try plugging the saw into a different AC outlet through a super-heavy extension cord made of #10 or #12 wire.
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On 28/01/2015 09:23, snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

Once the saw starts, the voltage drops to around 185V before coming back to 205 till the saw stops. Then, the voltage goes up to 210.
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wrote:

I saw you post this in a rely to my last message. I did not know you're outside the USA, which means I am not sure what you really have for power, or if the power company will help you. However, that is still a huge voltage drop and not normal. You said the saw is 2000W. That's not all that large and should not becausing such a drop. Some wiring, maybe the entrance cables are too small...... I dont know what else to say!
But here's a thought. Get a 12V Deep Cycle battery and an inverter to convert to 120V AC. Plug the scanner into the inverter connected to the battery. Then get a battery charger, probably 5 to 10 amp. Charger, but make sure it's a charger with "overcharge prevention" (shuts off when the battery is charged). Connect the charger from an outlet to the battery. PROBLEM SOLVED. You're running the scanner off the battery! (Of course make sure the inverter is big enough for the scanner, which I doubt uses very much power).
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On 28/01/2015 15:14, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

10,000 W. Maybe in this case, 2000 W is not that small.
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On Wednesday, January 28, 2015 at 9:14:35 AM UTC-5, yyy378 wrote:

Doh! That's about a 40A service? Even so, if the conductors are properly sized and everything is in proper order, a 2000W load shouldn't drop the service voltage 5V.
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Aaaaaaand there's your problem, right there.
10KW @ 220V = 45A.
Your service is way undersized.
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