How to know if you have 25 psi

I probably do as the pressure gets the water up to the 3rd floor with no problems. Center city Philadelphia. I guess it is ok. How about this Gerber, worth trying?
http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&q=Gerber+Ultra-Flush&cid 295231660891271119&os=reviews
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Why do you need pressure-assist if you have adequate pressure? The noise from some pressure-assisted toilets is quite loud.
Toto has probably the best toilet reputation. I find even their low volume tank toilets work just fine. R
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RicodJour wrote:

Not unless you're referring to those $3,000 computerized toilets that are common in Japan.
Here's Consumer Reports' 8/2009 evaluation:
http://imageshack.us/f/163/toilets82009.gif/
Out of 19 single-flush units tested, the best Toto ranked #9 (great for flushing solids, average for liquids), the other Toto, #15 (great for solids, awful for liquids).
The top 8 flushed both solids and liquids great:
American Standard Champion 4 2002.014 Kohler The Complete Solution Cimarr๓n K-n456 Kohler Highline Comfort Height K-3493 Gerber Avalanche 21-817 Gerber Ultra Flush 21-318 American Standard Flowise Cadet 3 2403.128 Gerber Ultra Flush 21-302 8 American Standard Cadet 2366.100
Also the #13 ranked toilet flushed just as well as the best, and like its #6 cousin it used only 1.28 gallons per flush:
American Standard FloWise Cadet 3 2835.128
However both of those American Standard FloWise Cadet 3 toilets were only average at cleaning the bowl, while all the others mentioned above, including the Totos, were above average in that respect.
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joevan wrote:

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&q=Gerber+Ultra-Flush&cid 295231660891271119&os=reviewsHi, 25PSI? In our city every house has water meter, pressure gauge and regulator. Our house has static 60PSI typical.
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wrote:

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joevan wrote:

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&q=Gerber+Ultra-Flush&cid 295231660891271119&os=reviews Look around the neighborhood for the water tower supplying your street. Most water distribution systems depends on gravity for the resulting pressure. The formula is 0.433 x height of tower = p.s.i. A tape measure, angle deducer, and trigonometry will easily give up the height of the tower.
So a water tank of 115 feet will yield a water pressure of 50 psi at street level. Assuming you have such a tower in your neighborhood, on the third floor, you'll have to subtract 25' of head (2.5 stories x 10' each). That yields:
(115 - 25) x 0.433 = 39 psi.
Alternatively, for the third floor, subtract about 11 psi from the street level pressure (25 x 0.433).
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Or trot down to a hardware store and get a cheap pressure gauge with a rubber nose that you hold on a faucet.
Harry K
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Harry K wrote:

That will certainly avoid the math (Maths is hard), but lacking sufficient skills in trigonometry, how's he going to count his change at the hardware store?
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