How to Hang large extension ladder on Garage Wall?

Page 1 of 2  
Hi All - Does anyone know the best way or what type of bracker/hanger to hang a heavy duty extension ladder (12ft closed, weighs around 50lbs +) on a garage wall which is sheet rock. The only thing I came across are these types of hangers (see link), but they don't seem to give much support. These would presumably just go in the sheet rock because I could not manually screw these into a stud and I would be afraid they would tear out over time and come crashing down on my auto. Any other recommendations would be most appreciated.
http://hardware.gillroys.com/Residence_hardware/Wardrobe_hooks/LADDER_HANGER-s251313.html
Thanks for all your help. :) Regards.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm sure you can find something similar designed for an extension ladder. You do need to locate the studs in the wall, and attach them in the center

http://hardware.gillroys.com/Residence_hardware/Wardrobe_hooks/LADDER_HANGER-s251313.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks RBM....I guess I would need to locate & install on studs for anything that heavy. Thanks for the advice. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Uh, drill a pilot hole?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

First, there is no reason you can't screws the brackets in the link into a stud. That's how they are designed to be used. Pre-drill a hole with a bit no larger than the body of the threaded portion - i.e. the diameter of the shaft not included the threads. If need be, when it gets too tight for you to continue screwing by hand, use a couple of pieces of wood clamped (or just held) onto the bent portion near the threads to give you more leverage.
Second, I've been hanging my 28' aluminum extension lader on the style of bracket shown here for 20+ years: http://tinyurl.com/377xh7
They are very easy to attach to the studs and you don't have to lift the ladder over the ends of the brackets like the one's in your link. The heavy duty style are certainly strong enough. In fact for about 15 years I also had a 10' wooden ladder hung on the same pair of brackets. The ones I use are about 8" along the wall and 12" for the vertical.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The bigbox stores sell ladder brackets for a couple of bucks each that do not require direct screwing into a stud. <(Amazon.com product link shortened)93585479&sr=1-1>

The hanger you provided a link for absolutely must be screwed into a stud. There are others that do not.
Assuming the sheetrock is properly mounted, there are sheetrock fasteners that are rated for up to 50 pounds each. Considering that each hanger takes two fasteners, if you have a 50 pound ladder on four hangers, you're talking just over 6 pounds per fastener. That's hardly overstressing the sheetrock.

Something like this would also work: <http://www.drdcorp.com/handy-hooker/ladder_hanger.htm
If you don't know how secure the sheet rock is, you'll need to get a stud finder <http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber375> and mount the hangers to the studs.
-- "Tell me what I should do, Annie." "Stay. Here. Forever." - Life On Mars
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks DerbyDad and Rick - That's exactly the kind of advice/ assistance I was looking for. Very Helpful and will go with that type of bracket DerbyDad mounted to the studs. (better than "Uh, drill a pilot hole?") :) Regards and thanks again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think the shelf brackets you are thinking of using (the DerbtDad type) will look as good as the ones you shown in the picture you posted. I have them in my house. They look better and they work well. Just screw them into the wooden studs.
I don't know what would be good if you have metal studs -- maybe some kind of hollow wall fastened that are made for that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The brackets won't "look as good"?
Oh, that's must be the reason the Fine Living Channel rejected my house from it's Showcase of Homes. I used an ugly bracket to hang my frigging ladder. Damn, and I was so close!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't you watch TV? Haven't you seen shows like Stage This House? Just imagine -- remove unsightly old brackets in garage; replace with sightly ladder hanging brackets for only a few dollars; added value to the house $1,000. :-)
Okay, I confess. I watch those shows for the women hosts and watching them "getting down and dirty" supposedly helping do the construction while wearing fashion outfits and high heals.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re: if you have a 50 pound ladder on four hangers, you're talking just over 6 pounds per fastener
This is true once the load is static, but it is not always easy to gently lower a 50 pound item evenly across all hangers. If I were to use a hangers that were not attached to a stud (which I wouldn't) I would ensure that I used hangers that could withstand an accidental dropping of the ladder onto the brackets.
Of course, no one (not even me) has mentioned the fact that the OP might have metal studs. If that's the case, then many of the stud- based brackets that were suggested will not work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://hardware.gillroys.com/Residence_hardware/Wardrobe_hooks/LADDER_HANGER-s251313.html
All my wall spaces in the garage are used - too much junk and tools. The only way was to hang it flat to the ceiling. First in is the heavy 32' than the 24' below and than a shorter one below that as well. I've build a cage out of 2x4s attached to the ceiling joists for the 32' than the other two ladders are attached to the 32'.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Why WOULDN't you screw them into a stud? That's how they're designed to be used. Nothing will hold in sheetrock alone.
s

http://hardware.gillroys.com/Residence_hardware/Wardrobe_hooks/LADDER_HANGER-s251313.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorry - quite a bit can safety be hung on sheetrock alone...
-- "Tell me what I should do, Annie." "Stay. Here. Forever." - Life On Mars
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
ya ok....
s
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Atari26004Fun wrote:

http://hardware.gillroys.com/Residence_hardware/Wardrobe_hooks/LADDER_HANGER-s251313.html
Mount a 12' 1x2 to the sheetrock with a shit-load of toggle bolts. Then screw into the 1x2 whatever hangers you need.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I put up some peg board and then used hooks that attached to the peg board. The advantage going this way is that you get to pick exactly where you want to hang the ladder plus being able to utilize the peg board for other things. MLD

http://hardware.gillroys.com/Residence_hardware/Wardrobe_hooks/LADDER_HANGER-s251313.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How about hanging it from the ceiling? That's what I did with my 16' extension ladder. I'm 6' 1" tall so reaching the 8' ceiling is not much of a stretch.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 28 Oct 2007 07:48:51 -0700, Atari26004Fun

Home-built ladder hooks
I'm a heavy-duty type III 32-foot extension ladder owner. Put the ladder against the wall where you want to hang it. Find three stud locations on the wall that fall best-centered between the rungs.
From (3 pine 8') 2x4s construct three of these:
| |--/ | / |/ | |
The triangle needs to fit between the ladder sides. And lag bolt them into the studs. Two will hold the ladder just fine, but three allows one bracket to fail and still hold the ladder. These home-made hooks are much stronger than the Gilroy's hooks, plus the extra 2x4 above and below will help protect the wall from being banged up as you get/put your ladder.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Read the whole thread - lots of good info. One thing missing - the sensible way.
Of course this works only if you are not worried about thieves.
I borrowed a 24' from a buddy. He had it hanging in his garage and, as is normal for all places with hooks, there was the ladder and all sorts of other junk hung on top of it.
It now resides at my place until he needs it. Where? Hung on the outside back of the garage under the eaves. Out of the way, out of the weather and nothing is ever likely to be hung on top of it. Also easy to get to as opposed to wrestling it out of a garage.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.