How to fix these rotting floor joists

Hi,
In working in my kitchen, I uncovered this mess in the floor joists near the door.
http://freeboundaries.com/mess.jpg
I'm faced with the problem of how to fix this situation. I have cut off the part that was completely rotten. The joist right in the middle was sistered to give it the right height. There are two sisters because the carpenter didn't get it right the first time.
What you see down below the joists is a stone wall. I don't think it's flat enough to provide good support, i.e. if I were to put some lumber on it.
I would appreciate any suggestions on how to fix this problem.
Many thanks in advance,
Aaron
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first fix where the moisture is entering so its not a future problem!!!
Use PT wood level the top of the stone wall add some PT shims and sister new wood, I would double up all those beams.
you could put a piece of metal on top of the beams
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I meant to say piece of steel on top of stone wall, and sister a steel plate to the beam.
question what shape is the sill in? its likely rotten too:(
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geez is the sill rock? how old is the building?
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2008 11:25:08 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Not at all uncommon on an old "rubble" foundation. Unlike concrete or stone, rubble foundations are often damp. I'd be putting a PT sill on that foundation wall, using a concrete topper to get to the right level, and with a layer of 15 lb tarpaper (bituminous felt) between the concrete and the sill. That building is likely 100 years old, or very close.
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You may get better advice if you put up a photo from underneath showing the materials of which basement floor and walls are constructed, with an idea of scale.
In a modern house, the repair method is to start with a single beam capable of carrying the whole load, that must be fitted exactly level (adjusted with jack stands) and set 1/8 inch high. Prerequisite for this is how to get the ends of the beam into or underneath joists etc. When satisfied with the beam you can repair related joists; and finally remove the jack stands.
But the first photo does not show whether this old house has space to work underneath the old floor, or solid walls or floor onto which the main beam could fit.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
  Click to see the full signature.
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if theres room to work from below like a crawl space it might be easiest to put support post from below, to code, like well below frost line. done right this can support several beams.
really need more photos, details and info
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2008 09:53:53 -0800 (PST), Aaron Fude

Call an Engineer for an on-site visit and report.

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There may be rot you cant see where its recessed, you have it open now to make it last another 200 years. Stone walls are cold maybe 1R, foam would be best. Wood has a high R value not stone.
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*Your photo reminded me of an old tenement I worked on in New York City Years ago. I went down to the lower floor to do some demolition on the wiring and my leg went through the floor. After I got myself out I went and told the construction supervisor. A few days later they ripped EVERYTHING out. The joists were rotted on the ends like yours. They installed all new joists (No sistering), but sealed the ends of the wood first. The foundation was all stone and the joists were slightly below grade.
You should probably do the same. Remove each joist one at a time and put a new one in its place. Seal or primer the ends.
Do you feel as though you have opened a "Can of worms" with your kitchen project?
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