How to 'extend' radiator pipes after tiling bathroom

We have hot water radiant heat in our house. After having our bathroom re-tiled, the radiator now sits 3/8" higher than previously so the two pipes coming out of the floor are 3/8" too short. I cannot remove the 3/4" steel pipes, because I do not have access to the other ends. A male/female coupling extends the pipe too much (about an inch) and I do not want to put the radiator up on blocks. I also do not want to cut the legs of the radiator to shorten it. Is it possible to cut the threads off of the supply and return pipes and place a brass (or steel) fitting on the end that is a compression fitting for a 1" OD pipe and has a 3/4" NPT fitting on the other end?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

gien the hazards of a leak i would get a insured professional HVAC company to make the modifications.... disassimiliar metals can cause troubles too, you might consider a new radiator they are thinner and look modern......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Didn't you forsee this problem when you contracted to have the floor retiled? A competent tile person should have warned you of this problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, 17 September 2012 03:35:33 UTC+1, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

om re-tiled, the radiator now sits 3/8" higher than previously so the two p ipes coming out of the floor are 3/8" too short.  I cannot remove the 3/4 " steel pipes, because I do not have access to the other ends.  A male/fe male coupling extends the pipe too much (about an inch) and I do not want t o put the radiator up on blocks.  I also do not want to cut the legs of t he radiator to shorten it.  Is it possible to cut the threads off of the supply and return pipes and place a brass (or steel) fitting on the end tha t is a compression fitting for a 1" OD pipe and has a 3/4" NPT fitting on t he other end?

Obviously this person didn't, so why do you make a ridiculous comment like this? To make yourself feel better?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/5/2016 6:08 AM, snipped-for-privacy@soas.ac.uk wrote:

And your reason for chiming in on a 3½ year old post is? Feel better now? <g>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Use a masonry drill of the proper size to remove an appropriate amount of the tile from beneath where the "legs" of the radiator sit to lower the height of the radiator and match the pipes...
As others have mentioned this should have been a foreseeable issue during the remodel... The floor apparently is 3/8" higher now than it used to be, what about the transition to the room/hallway outside the bathroom, or is that covered by a large threshold ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OP-
You write... "I cannot remove the 3/4" steel pipes, because I do not have access to the other ends."
Unless you're in an apt or multi-unit dwelling, access is downstairs or in the basement / crawl space. Even it you are in an apt or multi-unit dwelling, there's always access...it's just time & money.
Bite the bullet, make access from above or below and fix the pipe length.
This could have been done from inside the bathroom prior to the tiling job by cutting away the subfloor, shortening the pipe & re-threading in situ.
Still can be done from inside the bathroom but part of the new floor would need to be removed. :(
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Aren't those pipes going into the floor also threaded together...? -----
- gpsman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How much pipe is sticking out of the floor? You say you can't add a coupling because it would then be too long. But if there is enough pipe to work with, you could cut off some of the pipe, re-thread, then use the coupling, nipples, etc to make it back up. That assumes you have enough clearance from the wall for access.
Another option as someone else suggested might be to get a different radiator.
If you're not familiar with plumbing like this, I'd call in a pro. What you think is impossible they may be able to do in a couple hours.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Removing the tile where the radiator feet are located seems about the easiest and surest way to get things back to where they were.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Another possibility would be to use the couplings that the OP talked about that result in the radiator being a bit high, then placing a piece of wood or similar under the radiator to raise it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

In all the years that I worked for a floor covering company we never had this problem. We never removed the radiators, we just raised them a half inch, installed the tile, and lowered them in place. Most pipes have enough gove to be raised that much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.