How to dry flooded laminate floor?

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RicodJour wrote:

does? If so, even if it is closed-cell, that is a lot of little pockets for water to hide in. Can you say mold incubator? Like everyone else said- call your insurance agent. I take it you own the building? Only sure cure is rip out, dry out, and replace as needed. ServiceMaster and similar companies specialize in this kind of work, but at the prices they usually charge, self-help demo and hiring a flooring company to put down a new floor, may be about as cheap. Taking stuff out is easy, if you don't plan on reusing it.
-- aem sends...
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replying to RicodJour, Stormsnomore wrote: I am experiencing this situation with water due to a severe storm in our area with torrents or wind and rain. Due to past storms in our state, many insurance company's went under leaving us with state funded insurance, with only helps us in catastrophic events. So no help with our floor. They said our home was just deteriorating through normal aging thus the reason for occasional water from certain weather related conditions. Don't assume everyone can make an insurance claim. Fortunately the leak was very minimal no visible swelling in the affected corner. But getting to it would mean removing a very large area. Just put it down 3 months prior.
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replying to Stormsnomore, passerby wrote: If the swelling is not visible (or minimal), and at least a few hours have passed, then there is no reason to even touch it. If it were to swell, it would have done so already. Once it swells, there's nothing you can do except replace - it will stay warped even after it dries. That said, it is hard to say which way the water goes between underlayment and the planks. If it's very recent, and I mean just a couple hours ago, you may still see some more swelling elsewhere. Not much you can do about it but wait until the event is over, then assess the damage and replace what's damaged.
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replying to RicodJour, Patty wrote: The problem with the insurance claim is this: once you put in a claim, your insurance goes up for three or five years, and if you want to switch insurance, they can see your claim and the price will be higher. Happ Ned to us in NJ.
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james wrote:

get a commercial dehumidifier in there STAT. might already be too late.
nate
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replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
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james wrote:

Short of having a prof. mitigation company handle it, I would have rented a powerful wet vac. ASAP. After that, if still squishy, lay down old towels and try to squeeze more water to the surface. Then, fans and dehumidifier.
Not very comparable, but we had a flood in our kitchen, shortly after redoing cabinets. Afraid the plywood cabinets would bulge from water, but we got it up fast enough that that was avoided. Particle board would probably have been worse because it expands and then crumbles.
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That materials looks exactly what I put in a former office. A floating material - not terribly expensive. The instruction were to only damp mop the floor, and to avoid prolonged periods of water at the edges.
Anyway, I would not hire the same installer. Photo 2, enlarged to "X3Large", bottom of photo shows three rows/courses that are not staggered. Each of the 3 boards end on the same line.
4 cents worth now days
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Excellent catch.
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Actually that's the design of the floor. Its a wider plank floor made up of three board images.
Look out at the "dry" areas were the light hits it, you can see the edges of the boards puckered up.
But anyway this entire floor is toast. Those edges will never flatten out. They will dry out eventually but as furniture is moved around it will chip and look like crap.
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Who owns the sprinkler? If you are a tenant and another tenant or the building owner caused the damage, they have liability.
Given the amount of water, my guess is the floor is pretty well toast at this point. If the boards show any signs of selling, they are never going to fit again. If the water was a puddle in one spot, it may not be a big deal, bug given the saturation, water is probably between the wood and the plastic membrane and the plastic and the floor. It could take months to dry out. The cost of taking it up, drying, replacing, may be near the cost of a new floor.
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If someone wanted me to take it up carefully, dry it and replace it, I'd charge double a new floor at least.
People are talking about drying out the laminate flooring. You can reduce the moisture content, but how are you going to eliminate the swelling? It can't be done without heat and pressure that is most certainly not within a DIY or even committed contractor's capabilities. Even if it were, it's not worth it for laminate flooring.
R
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What does your insurer say and what does the manufacturer say?
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After 7 years, the OP has probably figured out what to do.
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