How to clean frosted glass table top

I have a dinning table that has a frosted glass table top. Only thing is, the design is such that the sand blasted side faces up. It really isn't a problem because we can wipe it down pretty good until recently there were some spots - not sure what it is - crayons? sauce? something seemed to settle into it. I tried to wipe, scrub, rub etc... to no avail.
Any idea what I can do to clear stain from the frosted side would be greatly appreciated.
O
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have you tried a scrubbing brush? not a sponge or something but a brush. an old toothbrush should work...
randy

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Puddle some full-strength household ammonia (sudsy or clear) over the stain and allow this to set for 10 minutes. Then brush with a nylon-bristle brush (a toothbrush should work). Rinse and dry. If the stain is grease-based, the stain should disappear or fade.
If the stain is from fruit, use household bleach (instead of the ammonia) as directed above. Remember: It is dangerous to mix bleach and ammonia!!!
On Sat, 30 Oct 2004 19:04:12 -0400, "orangetrader"

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On Sat, 30 Oct 2004 19:04:12 -0400, "orangetrader"

Has it occured to you that the shop may have installed the tabletop upside down. See if you can put the smooth side up. If it looks OK then that's probably how it should be.
As for cleaning stains Fantastik or Windex, a common household cleaner is usually quite effective.
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No the frosted side is supposed to be faced up. The smooth side is coated with a mirror coating, so that when the frosted side is up, it looks like a dul frosted mirror, it's hard to describe. I used all types of cleaners so far from Windex to Clorex to Mineral Spirit to acetone to WD40.
O
wrote:

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On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 00:39:57 -0400, "orangetrader"

A solution may then be to equalise-blend the optical properties. Try wiping on an acrylic liquid floor wax that goes by the name of Future Wax from Johnson and Johnson. As a floor wax I imagine it will be hard wearing and tolerate normal use encountered on a dining table. If it doesn't work out Future Wax is soluble in alcohol and can be easily removed.
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On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 00:39:57 -0400, "orangetrader"

The cleaners mentioned will remove many types of stain (dirt, fruit, crayon, etc) but not rust. Wet the stained area with vinegar, sprinkle on salt and gently brush. Or, try CLR or other product containing oxalic acid.
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Phisherman wrote:

A glass shop can probably polish out or sandblast the stain. I'd be inclined to do that before using an acid on it.
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clipped

Fantastik is a great grease remover but not supposed to be used on glass - it will etch glass. Ask me how I know :o)
If the mark is grease, mineral spirits may remove it. Takes crayon off stuff nicely. Then wipe with soapy cloth and rinse.
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On Sat, 30 Oct 2004 19:04:12 -0400, "orangetrader"

Misssed that one on crayons. Wax is water repellent and water based cleaners won't work on it. The solvent for wax is Xylene, available from the paint department at Home Depot. Xylene is the thinner for two part automotive paints (and the body shop supplies label it as a reducer or some fancy name like that.)
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