How to block UV from PEX

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Anyone have recommendations on how to block UV light from the PEX tubing in my basement? All PEX runs are bundled and run just under the ceiling joists, but I have three large windows that let in quite a bit of light. I will eventually build a soffit to isolate these pipes, but want an interim solution since I've read that PEX should not be exposed for more than 30 days and I won't have time to build the soffit in the next 30 days. Foil wraps, paint, etc? Any recommendations for something that'll be quick and easy?
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I don't think you have a problem.
If you're really worried about it paint it. You can use some left over ordinary house paint. It won't stick real well but it sounds like you are after a short term fix anyway.
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Hang UV film in front of windows, if they are not dual pane you could adhere the film to the glass, Most any box store has UV film, or curtains in daytime even blankets or sheets or roll construstion paper, it will save on AC costs as well. Its less trouble than painting pipe.
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True enough. In any case I doubt enough uv survives being reflected onto the pipe to make a difference. The op could do nothing and still be ok. I certainly wouldn't bother.
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Ive had a pvc supply in sun for 10 years, im suprised it still intact, you are right not much UV will reflect up any way its absorbed in the direct rays probably 90+%, When fabric fades from UV is whats mainly in direct rays.
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Yea, I have some sections of pvc that have been outside for 15 years now. Sprinkler lines that come out of the side of the house down near the ground. They are in the shade from trees and bushes. They don't show any signs of serious damage. I agree, pretty much need full direct sunlight for any noticable uv damage on anything.
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jamesgangnc wrote:

The first sign will be when you bump it and it shatters. UV basically makes the PVC very brittle.
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Why did people switch the topic from the OP's question about UV and PEX degradation to discussing PVC? They're two different animals.
I agree that the OP's situation doesn't present a problem. http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen06/gen06495.htm The glass will filter most of the UV, and it's unlikely that the significantly reduced strength of reflected UV will compromise the PEX.
R
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They might be two different animals but both are not designed with uv protection. The discussion didn't go from pex to pvc, it went from pex to is there a general risk involving indirect exposure.
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jamesgangnc wrote:

Hmmm, Why only PEX then? Even your skin is in danger then. Some really worry too much. So far I never heard PEX being damaged by indirect exposure. Ordinary glass blocks quite a bit of UV ray already. Nothing lasts forever.
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The OP should wrap him / her self in aluminum foil, also?
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This from the PPFA: Can PVC pipe be exposed to the sun? PVC does not readily degrade when exposed to sunlight (ultraviolet radiation) due to natural UV inhibitors present in the material. Short- term exposure to sunlight, such as during construction, is typically not a problem for PVC pipe. PVC piping may be used in outdoor applications when the piping system is painted with a light-colored water based acrylic or latex paint that is chemically compatible with PVC. When painted, the effects of UV exposure are significantly reduced.
This is spot-on for the OP's question: http://www.plbg.com/forum/read.php?1,272730
Some PEX has UV inhibitors, some don't. There are different cross- linking methods for PEX, and that affects water quality. There's no simple answer other than the OP will no longer be in his house when diffuse, filtered, UV light finally breaks down the PEX. He probably won't even be alive!
R
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This from the PPFA: Can PVC pipe be exposed to the sun? PVC does not readily degrade when exposed to sunlight (ultraviolet radiation) due to natural UV inhibitors present in the material. Short- term exposure to sunlight, such as during construction, is typically not a problem for PVC pipe. PVC piping may be used in outdoor applications when the piping system is painted with a light-colored water based acrylic or latex paint that is chemically compatible with PVC. When painted, the effects of UV exposure are significantly reduced.
This is spot-on for the OP's question: http://www.plbg.com/forum/read.php?1,272730
Some PEX has UV inhibitors, some don't. There are different cross- linking methods for PEX, and that affects water quality. There's no simple answer other than the OP will no longer be in his house when diffuse, filtered, UV light finally breaks down the PEX. He probably won't even be alive!
==================
You're cluttering the discussion with facts. Cut it out. :-)
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Since they are two different materials, the risk involved with UV exposure to one has nothing to do with the risk of the other. In other words, while both should not be exposed to excessive UV, exactly what happens to PEX could be very different from what happens to PVC. Both an umplugged TV and sodium should not be placed in water. The results however of not following that guidance are very different. One catches fire and explodes, the other simply becomes inoperable.
In the case of PVC, the manufacturers have test data that show the only significant effect from UV exposer is to make it more brittle and subject to shattering when hit. Other than that it does not lessen it's ability to function in normal pressure water systems.
As long as PEX will accept paint, then that should protect it from UV. That is what is recommended for PVC exposed to UV, as in pool applications. But exactly what happens to the characteristics of PEX from UV, I don't know.
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ransley wrote:

PVC is made with all kinds of UV resistance, anywhere from a few months (starts discoloring after that) to 70 years for siding. I've seen lots of white PVC water pipe turn purple-brown after a few years in Phoenix and become more brittle, but isn't too easy to break.
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Matt wrote:

Hi, IMHO, you are over-worrying.
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You're over-worrying, but if you must, wrap in aluminum foil and get some sleep.
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wrote:

You're over-worrying, but if you must, wrap in aluminum foil and get some sleep.
========= The crinkled foil will provide an excellent surface to which spider webs can cling. That will generate a "How do I get rid of all these spiders?" discussion 6 months from now. :-)
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Other UV resistant options include wool blankets (think moth) and burlap feed or flour bags (meal worms). Mylar space blankets may provide some UV resistance. I'm going to enjoy feeding this thread.
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Wrap them in in foam rubber tubing or whatever the correct term is.
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