How to add GFCI to circuit with obsolete breaker box?

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I want to add GFCI to a pool light circuit. I traced the circuit to a Square D XO subpanel. The XO series breaker box is obsolete and the only breakers I can find are regular used ones (no GFCI breakers for XO). It would be a huge job to replace the entire subpanel just for this circuit, because it contains a maze of other old circuits. Is there any GFCI breaker that will plug into the XO box? Is there a GFCI device that I can connect to the junction box in the pool equipment room? Maybe a simple one switch circuit breaker box that can connect through a knockout.. something that would install without turning it into a huge construction job?
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You can simply add a GFI outlet in the pool equipment room somewhere on that circuit before the pool lighting, or use a blank GFI before the pool lighting like this: http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ibeCCtpSctDspRte.jsp?section623&minisite021
Both offer the same protection. You could probably mount the box on the breaker cabinet with a knockout, or somewhere on a wall in the equipment room.
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I think that would work and I may order a Leviton 8590-RBW blank GFCI. Should I place it after the light switch for the in-ground pool light, or before the switch? There are 3 other patio rooms sharing this circuit for their lights.
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*That device is switch rated so you could replace your existing switch with the GFI switch. You will need the neutral line and load in addition to the hot wires.
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Ideally you want to place it downstream from the patio lights so if it does trip, the patio lights will not go out. As far as placing it before or after the switch for the pool lights, it does not matter. I was brainstorming a bit ( too early in the morning for that) and you could actually just change out your existing pool light switch to one of these: http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ibeCCtpItmDspRte.jsp?item=417265&section=11624
That would give you GFI protection as well as give you an outlet. But you have to remember to wire so that the pool lights would be on the "LOAD" side of the outlet.
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I should add that the GFI combo switch/outlet will only work if you have 110V coming into the switch box for your pool lights.
If you have only a switch leg ( just 2 wires in the box that are connected to the switch) then you have to use my first suggestion.
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that's even better, I like that idea.
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wrote:

Ideally you want to place it downstream from the patio lights so if it does trip, the patio lights will not go out. As far as placing it before or after the switch for the pool lights, it does not matter. I was brainstorming a bit ( too early in the morning for that) and you could actually just change out your existing pool light switch to one of these: http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ibeCCtpItmDspRte.jsp?itemA7265&section624
That would give you GFI protection as well as give you an outlet. But you have to remember to wire so that the pool lights would be on the "LOAD" side of the outlet.
*It has been a while since I installed a GFI combo device. I don't remember if the switched load is GFI protected or not. It doesn't say at the link.
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From what I remember, the switch is just a simple switch, it has 2 tail wires on the combo device. It has nothing to do with the GFI outlet, so the OP would need to tie the neutral of the pool lights to the "LOAD"side, then tie the hot of the pool lights to one tail of the switch, then the other tail would simply go to the "LOAD" hot terminal. Again, this is only if he has the 110V feed coming into the box. If the patio lights come out of the same box, he can tie those to the "LINE" side.
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I made a drawing of the two existing switches (link below). With the setup shown in this drawing, how would I hook up the Leviton switch/GFCI outlet combo? One of the existing switches is for some landscape flood lights, and the other switch is for the in-ground pool light. I'd like to swap out both with GFCIs..
http://www.autonvs.com/images/poolswitches.jpg
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Nice drawing, however if it is accurate, you have no grounding conductors and should disconnect it and replace the wiring. The landscape wiring has the neutral cut off, so for it to work, some type of Rube Goldberg wiring must have been done. To connect the pool light to a combo GFCI switch, You connect the feed neutral to the "line" neutral on the device. Connect the pool light neutral to the "load" neutral on the device. (Under the yellow tape). Connect the pool light black to the "load" hot. Connect the feed hot to one of the black wires on the device. Connect the other black wire on the device to the "line" hot.

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Indeed I was puzzled why the landscape light neutral is cut off. The cables have bare ground wires, these appear to be all connected to the junction box metal and not shown in the drawing.
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That's a good thing. As Mike Rock pointed out, you won't be able to connect the landscape lights to a GFCI without an active neutral in that box. If it's possible, I would run a new cable from that box to the first landscape fixture. You will also have to find and disconnect whatever is currently being used as a neutral, or the GFCI would just trip.
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Because of the location of the landscape lights where it would be difficult to install extra conduits underground, I suspect that this junction box is the only neutral/ground source (not using a neutral from some other part of the circuit). Probably the builder is using just the ground and hot wire from this pool room switch box. If my understanding of GFCI is correct, sounds like GFCI cannot be used for the landscape lights because there would be no difference between neutral and ground in this case and the GFCI neutral can never be a pure ground? I sometimes get confused on this finer distinction because ground and neutral is bonded together at the main panel.
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iwdplz wrote:

it seems like someone violated code somewhere in that setup, currents must be balanced within a cable, summat ain't right
nate
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replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
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In other words, I can understand that if there is a neutral re-used from another part of the circuit, the landscape light GFCI would trip because of tiny differences in the neutral when other loads are applied on the circuit. However if this part of the light circuit is using only a direct ground, wouldn't the GFCI still function ok by detecting when the "normal ground" becomes disconnected and replaced by an "improper ground" like a wet person? Because there is a fluctuation in the current in the transition between the two?
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iwdplz wrote:

no.
the GFCI must be in a box where both hot and neutral are available - it has connections for both. The GFCI compares currents between the two wires, and if they differ by more than 5 mA or so, it'll shut off the power. this is why it also can't be used to replace a switch used in a "switch leg" configuration, because there's no neutral available there.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
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The GFCI device senses the current going out on the hot leg and returning on the neutral. If they are not equal, current is leaking to ground, and the device cuts out. Where your landscape lights are concerned, the neutral wire is probably broken, so to make the lights work, he just connected the bare ground as a neutral replacement. That circuit won't work on a GFCI device as there would always be leakage into ground on the bare wire, causing an imbalance. It is also a potentially dangerous situation for anyone that may touch one of these fixtures. If they happen to be touching anything that is better grounded than the ground wire, they could become part of the circuit.

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That wiring makes sense and I tried it just now, but the GFCI trips immediately so the pool light never turns on. I also noticed that the landscape light doesn't turn on anymore - so I jumpered the feed neutral to the pool light neutral like it was before, and now landscape light turns on ok via the other switch. So the pool light and landscape light must be using the same neutral. I am puzzled why the GFCI is tripping and how I should wire it given this new info..
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Update:
When I add the landscape light to the Load terminal in the GFCI combo device (instead of a separate switch), it works. Now the GFCI works for both the pool light and landscape lights. Except now I don't have independent control over them. That's fine because the landscape lights are next to the pool anyway. So this way I have GFCI protection for ALL of the outdoor lights near the pool.
Why does this GFCI tripping happen with a separate landscape light switch? My guess is that by turning on the landscape switch, it causes the current to drop unevenly in the circuit legs and the GFCI senses a slight mismatch. So by combining them together the current drop is evenly matched.
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