How old is too old for a smoke detector ?

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On Sun, 18 Jan 2015 09:26:38 -0500, Stormin Mormon

run off 120 volts through a wall-wart. (all except one, which uses a 9 volt battery instead of the rechargeable) They are nighthawks.
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On Sun, 18 Jan 2015 05:59:46 -0800 (PST), trader_4

Our city rental code requires the batteries to be replaced every year. As I recall, back when most 9v batteries were just carbon cell they lasted about a year in a smoke detector. But Alkaline last 3 to 5 years. I think there are some lithium's that last 10 years.
I've always used alkaline in the ones at my residence and they last a lot longer then a year before they start beeping.
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Perhaps not married any more is more accurate??
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trader_4 wrote:

That is true, he does not have to bring it up to new construction code. Its a good opportunity to exercise best practice though.
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G. Morgan wrote:

Just do things just to get by code? Family life is depend on it. There is no such things as over safety as far as I am concerned. smoke/flame detectors, CO detectors, gas detecter hard wired with battery back up. Diligent annual check up and testing like a ritual. Here often local government is talking about sprinklers in residential new construction. Today's vinyl sidding clad house is very bad in fire.
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On Sunday, January 18, 2015 at 10:53:11 PM UTC-5, Tony Hwang wrote:

You can put 50 of them in your house, if you like. I don't see it doing much to improve safety. Code 30 years ago was one on each level, one in the hall outside bedroom areas. That works for me. Every house fire death report in the news that I've ever seen, there were either no smoke detectors, they had no batteries, etc.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yes, absolutely. I forgot to mention that, thanks.
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wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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Tony Hwang wrote:

I recommend "overdoing" it, make no mistake. It was my profession for many years.
The law does not prescribe an existing structure to be brought up to new construction code, that's all I was repeating from the one who posted before my comment.
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On Tuesday, January 20, 2015 at 11:59:59 AM UTC-5, G. Morgan wrote:

It probably doesn't have to be brought up to current code for new construction, but many places do have requirements specifically requiring smoke detectors to obtain a new certificate of occupancy. So, I think it's somewhere in the middle. Say you go to sell or rent out a house. Like you say, there isn't a reqt to bring most of it up to current code. They aren't going to make you change the kitchen wiring, as long as it was compliant when built. But they may have laws that specifiy the minimum with regard to smoke detectors. That's how it works here. To get the CO there is a law that says you have to have the minimum with regard to smoke detectors. The fact that the house didn't have them when it was built 50 years ago doesn't matter.
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Frank wrote:

I went on an 'emergency service call at 3AM one morning. The customer insisted one of our smoke detectors was beeping, well I tried explaining over the phone our monitored smokes don't "beep". They insisted I come out anyway. They had been looking for the source for hours.
I went out, looked around the house for about 5 minutes and found a pager on top of the fridge beeping. I tossed the guy his "bad smoke detector" and told him I'd be right back. I came in with an invoice for the normal service call plus an extra $120 for a late-night call that was non-emergency. He was livid I was charging him about $250 to find his beeping pager. I was not sympathetic. He woke me out of bed, and I *knew* it had nothing to do with his fire system (I had called the monitoring center for any signals).
I don't remember if I got a check that night or not, but I definitely turned in the invoice to the office the next day.
I had another late-night call where the keypad *was* beeping. I tried to tell him how to silence it over the phone, but he wouldn't hear of it. Again he insisted I come out. When I got there a screwdriver was plunged straight through the keypad. He silenced it alright. I charged him for the keypad and the service call.
Don't think I was always a dick though... Most of the time there was a legitimate reason for the late-night call. For those I fixed what I could, silenced any nuisance noise, and apologized for any inconvenience, no charge. I arranged for a lengthy service call the next day to check the entire system and replace any parts I didn't have or would have taken all night to fix.
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trader_4 wrote:

Everyplace differs, that's why the best answer is always consult the AHJ.
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micky wrote:

In most (if not all) Texas jurisdictions it's for commercial buildings where the public will be entering and also multi-tenant residential buildings.
For existing residential single family homes or duplexes a simple home inspection is all that it needed when the real estate changes ownership. And that is only when financing is involved. For cash deals, inspections are optional (but highly recommended of course).
New construction homes have to be inspected multiple times; electrical, plumbing, structural, concrete slabs, etc... before the sheetrock covers everything up. Then a final inspection by the city/county for the final approval when the house is almost ready to go to market.
Here is the summary of the code in Dallas: http://www.dallascityhall.com/building_inspection/pdf/How-to_certificate-occupancy.pdf
WHEN DO I NEED A CERTIFICATE OF OCCUPANCY (CO)? The Dallas Development Code requires that “Except for single family and duplex uses, a person shall not use or change the use of a building, a portion of a building, or land without obtaining a certificate of occupancy from the building official”.
• A new CO is required for the following: • First use of land or a building. • A change of use of land or a building. • A change of tenant on an existing CO. • Any change of floor area of an existing use.
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In wrote:

My hunch is that in your friend's case back then, the wiring to the original smoke detector that had gone bad was not working in the first place. If the system is wired correctly, putting in a new detector to replace the "bad one" should just be a matter of unplugging the old one and plugging in the new one (preferably same brand etc). That should work if the system is wired correctly.
When I bought and took over a triplex with a hard-wired 120 volt interconnected smoke alarm system, one of the detectors "would not work" -- meaning that it would not set off the rest of the smoke detectors when it went off. It turned out that the former owner had worked on the system and did not have it wired correctly. I had a lot of rehab done on the property after I bought it, and a friend and I fixed the wiring in the interconnected alarm system so that all of the detectors worked correctly.
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In wrote:

I am also in New Jersey and some towns have codes that exceed the statewide code -- at least they do for rental properties. I am not sure if those individual towns that have the higher standard also apply those standards to owner-occupied homes when the property is sold etc.
For example, for rental properties, some towns require a smoke detector INSIDE each bedroom as well as outside of bedrooms (within about 10 feet of the bedroom, I think).
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In wrote:

That's correct regarding cash deals for residential properties. But, for rentals, not every town requires a CO for every tenant change. Some do and some don't. Some require an inspection every year even if there are no tenant changes; some just require them at every tenant change; and some require both -- every year AND every tenant change (ridiculous).
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In typed:

Strange town -- Houston. I have relatives there (plus I live in New Jersey). I heard that Houston has very few zoning laws and allows oil wells next to homes etc.

Yes, it's true that we are not forced to pump our own gas like it is in almost every other state -- that's my way of putting it. You are correct that we (in New Jersey) are not allowed to pump our own gas, but I think of that as not being forced to pump our own gas. I always think it is weird when I drive to Pennsylvania on a freezing cold or rainy day and not only have to pay more per gallon for the gas there, but I have to get outside of my car and pump the gas myself.
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In typed:

I never heard of any code that says that. I don't think the NEC says that. But, maybe it is a local code where you are located. Where is it that you know of that has that code? -- just curious; not being judgmental.
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no longer existed, and no other brand was wired the same way. We just gave up and installed battery-op units - back then there were not wireless communincating systems available so they were "stand-alone"

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