How old is too old for a smoke detector ?

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On 1/17/2015 5:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

years old. they don't take batteries, that's probably why they have not received much attention. The are hardwired to AC with a signal wire to the other 2 detectors. Don't believe they are on a separate circuit, should they be ?

I've heard that ten years is about the age to replace.
Reccomend to contact the condo association.
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On Sat, 17 Jan 2015 22:26:28 -0500, Stormin Mormon

I was recently injected iwth something whose half-life for gamma emission is 6.0058 hours. I'm not good for much. .
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On 1/17/2015 4:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

smoke detectors. Be sure you have loud ones in the children's rooms. On TV I saw somebody do a test with some children and smoke detectors. They set up a low light camera in the children's room and then set off a smoke detector in the hall outside. The children never woke up. They moved the detector into the room and it took several minutes for 2 of the children to wake up and the third never did. So you want REALLY LOUD smoke detectors in the children's room.
Bill
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On 1/18/2015 9:30 AM, Bill Gill wrote:

Years ago, I saw some thing about a smoke detector with a sound recorder in it. You'd get either parent to record a couple seconds of his / her voice calling the child by name, and tell em to wake up and it's a fire drill.
Wonder if it's easier to have monthly stop drop and roll, crawl in smoke type drills. Then the kids associate the fire alarm horn with the drop roll and crawl drill?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It would be nice to have them on separate circuits, but not a code requirement.

Yes, they *must* be replaced @ 10 years old per NFPA code. Monitored detectors are exempt because they get inspected at least annually and usually have replaceable sensing chambers. Stand-alone detectors *must* be replaced every 10 years.
You'll see two types for sale, photoelectric and ionization. Get photoelectric types. They will detect smoldering fires faster and reduce false alarms.

Replace them with AC/DC type smokes (a backup battery) or just DC ones. Also get ones with an "interlock" feature, when one trips - they all sound. Now is a good time to bring it up to current code.
Place one outside of each sleeping area, for instance if there are 3 bedrooms upstairs and you can place one in the hall 15' (max range from corners & walls) from one side of the hall and no more than 15' from the other wall, one in the middle of the hall will suffice (the hall is 30' long or less). If the hall is longer, place one no less than 15' from one wall - then go up to 30' to the next one, etc.. For instance if the hall is 40' long place you need two detectors, placed 10' off each wall for uniform coverage.
If there is a master bedroom on the 1st floor, one needs to be placed outside of the MBR door. If there are two bedrooms downstairs on each side of the condo and they are more than 30' apart you need one outside EACH bedroom - else place one in between the two bedrooms if the doors are within 15' of each other.
Also, a detector must be inside of each and every bedroom. Usually placed 8 inches away from the corner of the wall and ceiling above the door. NEVER place them IN the corners, as smoke does not always accumulate there. The detector's instruction manual will show you proper placement, with a drawing.
I strongly recommend the interlock feature, even though this is not mandated in all jurisdictions. This will assure everyone sleeping will wake up if a fire happens at night. Also, have a plan in case of a detection - make sure kids know to get outside ASAP and have a pre-designated meeting area outdoors.
Never put smoke detectors in kitchens, use a RoR (Rate of Rise) heat detector instead. Same goes for attic spaces and garages (near gas H2O heaters, furnaces).
Now is a good time to install CO detector(s) as well. Follow the manufacturer's instructions. They usually mount lower than smoke detectors, carbon monoxide gas is neutrally buoyant in air.
Even better, if you have a monitored security system - consider letting the alarm company do the work and use monitored detectors. This will save property (the monitoring company calls the fire dept. if no one is home to hear the alarms) and lower insurance costs.

YW, and thanks for asking. If you have questions, please call the non-emergency number for the local fire dept. and ask for advice. Most will be happy to send someone out to help you plan the system. They would rather come now rather than later taking you or a family member out in a body bag.
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On Sunday, January 18, 2015 at 10:57:03 AM UTC-5, G. Morgan wrote:

e not received much attention. The are hardwired to AC with a signal wire t o the other 2 detectors. Don't believe they are on a separate circuit, shou ld they be ?

He can do what he wants, however there is no requirement that it be brought up to current code for new construction, at least here in NJ, which is pretty tough when it comes to code. Here a smoke detector inspection is required for a certifcate of occupancy and what is required is far more basic. For example, a smoke detector immediately outside a bedroom, as was code years ago, is still compliant. As is using one for two bedrooms, if those bedrooms are next to each other. etc.
I'd suggest he check what's required in his state and then decide.
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On Sun, 18 Jan 2015 12:39:54 -0800 (PST), trader_4

What does one need a C of O for? Serious question.

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On Wednesday, January 21, 2015 at 5:43:00 AM UTC-5, micky wrote:

When there is a change of occupancy for a residence, ie the property is sold or a new tenanat moves in. Some places may not require them, but many do. It's required in NJ. They send out an inspector(s) to check basic safety and health related issues. For example, if you have a well, a water test is required. They check for smoke detectors, missing guard rails on porches, stairs, obviously leaking plumbing, etc.
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trader_4 wrote:

Even on cash deals? Here in Houston the title company and banks require it, but not the government.
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On Wednesday, January 21, 2015 at 9:35:34 AM UTC-5, G. Morgan wrote:

Yes, even cash deals. Rentals too. New tenant, you need a new CO.
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trader_4 wrote:

Strange state, NJ. I have some relatives there. They allow medical marijuana, but its apparently illegal to sell it from a dispensary (from what I hear).
Plus they don't seem to acknowledge the 2nd Amendment. Sure its legal to have a gun in your home, but there is nowhere to buy them! I'm pretty sure they are a "no issue" state for concealed carry too.
Is it still true you can't pump your own gas?
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On Wednesday, January 21, 2015 at 1:15:52 PM UTC-5, G. Morgan wrote:

Not so strange, just infested with libs who've run it for emough of the time, ie control of the Semate and Assembly forever.... The occasional Christie can only stem the tide, not turn it.
IDK about the marijuana thing. I know Christie was having some ruckus about approving the dispensaries, or something, but really haven't followed it.

Plenty of gun stores. I think Walmart sells them too. I know they sell ammo. There are a few problems though. One is that it's relatively easy to buy a shotgun or rifle, just need the federal firearms ID. But you can't buy or possess an "assault rifle". The Dems passed that restriction here decades ago, so even though the federal ban is gone, they are still illegal in NJ. Every once in awhile they catch some poor SOB that's driving through the state, just got here, whatever and he winds up screwed because his rifle has the wrong stock. Go figure.
And for a pistol, you need a permit for each one that you buy. You have to apply at the local police. They start the investigation, including running you buy the FBI. That takes months. Last time I did it, it took close to a year. Then the permit is good for a limited period, maybe 90 days or so. You can get more than one at a time though.
Speaking of getting screwed, they regularly arrest other poor SOBs at JFK airport. Typical scenario is someone is coming from a state that allows pistols, connecting at JFK to go on to somewhere else where similarly the pistol would not be a problem. So, they walk up to American Airlines in Dallas, declare the pistol that's in their luggage. No problem, they put it on the plane with baggage. They arrive at JFK and for whatever reason, can't connect to their other flight. So, they have to stay overnight. They go retrieve their luggage, including the pistol. They head off to a hotel, probably right at the airport. Next day, they walk up to the AA check in counter and declare the pistol, just like they did in Dallas. Except this time, AA calls the cops and they are busted, big time. JFK is withing NYC and without a permit, it's a mandatory jail sentence. I think with a lot of high power legal help, probably from the right law firm, they can often get it reduced to some lesser charge. But they are still winding up at Rikers Island for a day or two on the initial arrest, which must be a lovely experience, paying a lot in legal fees, fines, having a record, etc. But heh, you gotta stop criminals, right?
I'm pretty sure they

Correct, basically. You need a special permit, signed off on by a judge and have to show a need to carry. So, unless you can make a compelling case, for the average joe, forget about it.

Yes, only one of two states. The other is Oregon, unless it recently changed there.
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G. Morgan posted for all of us...

Yup, catch 22. I think there is now one for the entire state.

You can buy them but not carry them IIRC. CC permits are "may issue" so they don't.
I'm in PA & my permit is not valid in any surrounding state. A story from 5- 6 months ago is a single mom with a PA permit drove over to NJ and subject to a traffic stop. IDK if she declared the gun or not but the PD slapped her in jail and the prosecutor made a big deal of it. IDR what the disposition of the case was but they were talking jail time at one point. Made a criminal out of a unblemished record single mom. Meanwhile they roam free in Newark...

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Frank wrote:

BULLSHIT!
This is very bad advice and also very dangerous advice!
You should not guess at something you don't know about, especially when someone's life could depend on it.
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NotMe wrote:
Good advice. Never "gift" used detectors! Only re-use the batteries for something else besides life-safety devices. Always use brand-new batteries when replacing them, and check the detectors twice a year - minimum. A good way to remember to check them is to do it when changing the clocks twice a year.
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micky wrote:

You're right, that's not a valid test. Testing is done according to the manufacturer's method.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Luckily, now they make wireless interconnects. They are more expensive, but that is something no one should skimp on.
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In typed:

Since you have FireX now, you may want to consider returning the Kidde detectors to Menard's and buying FireX replacement detectors.
As far as I can tell, replacing FireX detectors with Kidde detectors may involve having to use the "adapter" that comes with the Kidde models etc:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GeQ3BsXAWp8

My inclination would be to keep the same brand as the originals.
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In wrote:

I am not sure if replacing old detectors that were up to code when they were put in would require bringing the new system up to the current code. But, I would go with the battery backup models if it is do-able since that is safer. I am just guessing that the alarm systems have battery backups in case there is an electrical malfunction or short that causes a fire and also causes the power to go off.

I only have one property that has an interconnected hardwired alarm system with battery backup which has 5 detectors in the system. I don't recall the batteries chirping on going bad very often. I have had it happen once or twice in a few years, but only with one battery at a time -- not all of them every year or so. But, that is just a guess from memory since I didn't pay much attention to when this was happening.
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townhouse. We were unable to find a replacement that could be wired into his existing system that would communicate with the other units, or with each orher if we replaced them all as hard-wires units. We replaced them all with individual battery operated units
Kidde now has wireless battery operated interconnected alarms that can be "hushed" from any station. They also have combo cosmoke detectors that do not have replaceable batteries - you change the whole unit every 10 years. - available as standalone or 120 volt direct wired with 10 year backup battery.
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