How do you sharpen kitchen fruit peelers?

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I have two fruit peelers, one of which is dull.
http://oi59.tinypic.com/29pcj02.jpg
How does one sharpen them?
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On 7/5/2014 8:49 AM, Angel Rodriguez wrote:

Beats me, after 10 years or so we toss it and get a new one. You'd have to get a stone in there somehow to get it right.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

+1. Most fruits we eat w/o peeling.
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 05:49:37 -0700, Angel Rodriguez

Depends.
go to hardware store and buy a set of those tiny hand files. try to sharpenby using the various type of file that fits.
Be prepared these may be super hardened ?? in order to not need sharpening [yeah, sure, as verified by your question], which are harder than your file and you won't get anywhere.
Then that will require diamond files, not actually 'diamond' but granular diamonds all over the surface. Which means go online to look for those, anything that can file down through a lock clasp should work.
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Angel,
There are a few special sharpener jigs available but they are expensive and I've no idea how well they work. Oxo makes a peeler in which the blade can be replaced. The peeler sells for around $10 and new blades go for around $5.
Dave M.
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The time and effort to sharpen aren't worth the cost of new peelers.
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On Sat, 05 Jul 2014 21:10:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Then why does anyone sharpen a chain saw blade with a file? Or a knife on a sandstone? Or a drill bit in a bench grinder? Or a lawn mower blade with a dremel tool? etc
Certainly sharpening is worth the effort. You just have to have the tools and technique which is what the guy was asking.
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On 7/6/2014 1:20 AM, Handy Mann wrote:

It is worth investing $20 for tools to sharpen an item you can buy for $5? In the past 48 years we've bought maybe three peelers and probably would have lost the sharpening stones in between anyway.
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On 07/06/2014 01:20 AM, Handy Mann wrote:

If you are working 40+ hrs a week, sharpening a fricken potato peeler ain't worth the time and effort.
If you're retired, got nuthin to do and all day to do it, grab your hone and sharpen away. You can even take a nap when your done.
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On Saturday, July 5, 2014 10:20:26 PM UTC-7, Handy Mann wrote:

Because the items you mention are relatively high dollar items, need sharping often so the cost of the sharpening tools is worth it.
Buying tools to sharpen something that costs less than a couple bucks? No way.
I'm still using the same peeler I bought some 40 years ago and it is still just fine.
Harry K Harry K
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On Sunday, July 6, 2014 9:52:18 AM UTC-4, Harry K wrote:

I'd also add that the items on his list have designs that make it easy and practical to sharpen them. I can sharpen a mower blade very easily in a few minutes with a handheld grinder. A peeler is typically made of stainless steel and has a blade in a small opening. I think it would be a PIA to get a file on it at the right angle and to do the filing. If he wants to compare it to other sharp things, it would seem to me it's more like a disposable razor blade than it is a lawn mower blade. Maybe it can be done and it's practical, but so far I don't see anyone saying they do it.
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If I were going to try to sharpen rather than replace I wouldn't mess with the beveled side, just use a stone on the other side. AAMOF, I just looked at my wife's and that is where they were sharpend originally.
--

dadiOH
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On Sun, 06 Jul 2014 08:03:41 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Do you sharpen drill bits on your bench grinder? I do.
It's worth having a sharp bit, and not having to drive down to the store just to buy a $2 drill bit.
Likewise, is it worth sharpening your chain saw? Again, most people do even though a brand new chain is only about 20 bucks.
What about an old kitchen knife? Do you just buy a new one every time it gets dull?
I doubt that you do, if you're on this newsgroup.
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On 7/6/2014 10:35 AM, Handy Mann wrote:

I don't. I use mostly smaller bit that I can't easily sharpen and I'm not going to invest in a fixture or Drill Doctor. Brad points I do with a file.

But I buy a new peeler every 25 years.
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On 07/06/2014 09:18 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I don't even own a peeler. I don't feel the need to peel fruits and veggies.
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On Sun, 06 Jul 2014 08:40:37 -0400, dadiOH wrote:

Originally? And where are they sharpened now?
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On Sun, 06 Jul 2014 09:30:17 -0400, noname wrote:

I guess shop tools are worth the time and effort, but not kitchen implements.
Makes sense. The wife wouldn't know the difference.
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there are a variety of methods discussed on the internet:
use a stone
use a steel, by "peeling" the steel
use a paring knife
use the bottom of a nonglazed ceramic cup
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wrote:

For me it is a balancing act. I sharpen most items around the house. Even have a $ 100+ drill doctor to sharpen bits as I never learned to do it on a grinder. No more than I drill, it would probably pay me to just get new bits. Got that drill doctor for a Christmas present as I could not think of anything else I wanted.
Other things such as putting some tar on the roof I use inexpensive paint brushes and throw them away. It would cost more for cleaner than the brushes. Last year I tosssed out a John Deere mower that had about 350 hours on it. About 8 years old. The transaxel went out. It would have cost about half th eprice of the mower to replace it and it still would only be good for about that much longer. Thought I was buying quality,but found out later they made a piece of junk to sell. Last Deere I will buy.
If that fruit peeler is less than say $ 5 and you don't have a tool to sharpen it, toss and get a new one. If you do have the tool and it takes only a short time , then sharpen it. I often sharpen the blades on my utility knife as it only takes a short time to do so even though they are not very expensive.
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Angel Rodriguez wrote:

but plenty of good knives are sharpened on only one side.
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