Home Heating Oil

My son has swithched to a Pellet Heating insert, for the majority of heat. He has a boiler, that had supplied Both his home heat as well as his hot water. He is now using FAR less " heating" oil. That boiler continues to supply the hot water
My question: Should he add any preservative (ala Stabil for gasoline) to his oil tank. He used to use a few tanks a year, now less than one refill per year.
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On 3/30/2015 10:07 AM, Dave C wrote:

Can't hurt. There are a couple of treatments that prevent gelling in the cold, help get rid of water and sludge. My biggest concern would be condensation.
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Don't use the Stabil for gasoline, use one for diesel as heating fuel is either the same or very close to the same as diesel fuel depending upon the supplier and region.
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On 3/30/2015 10:07 AM, Dave C wrote:

I've heard that water in the tank is not good. Perhaps your oil supplier can suggest what works around your area?
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Mon, 30 Mar 2015 12:29:33 -0400, Stormin Mormon

It's not just water. You don't want algae slime growing in your fuel oil
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On 3/30/2015 6:31 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

And, where do you think the algae grows? And if you remove the water, what is no longer a problem? Five letters, and begins with a.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Mon, 30 Mar 2015 18:48:21 -0400, Stormin Mormon

Algae are a life form found in water, similar to algae growing in an aquarium. Algae do not live in fuel and it requires sunlight to grow. For years, people have been referring to tank sludge and the jelly, slime and other contaminants found in fuel filters as “algae”. The colloquialism “diesel fuel algae” is widely used and understood. However, there is no relationship between the “algae” growing in your aquarium and the sludge “growing” (forming) in your fuel tank and showing up on your filter elements.
There are three basic areas of concern about contaminants in fuel and oil:
1. Water
2. Inorganic debris (sand, dust, rust, etc.)
3. Organic debris (fuel breakdown products and waste products of fuel deterioration and re-polymerization)
The organic debris represents more than 90% of all contaminants found in fuels and oil. It is this organic debris, the sludgy, slimy, acidic material that people refer to as “diesel fuel algae”. It could also be called a polymer, tar, wax or asphalt!
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On 3/30/2015 9:47 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

http://www.mydieseldoctor.com/FAQ.html
Master of the cut and paste?
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Tue, 31 Mar 2015 09:50:34 -0400, Stormin Mormon

When it serves my purpose, yes. Otherwise some silly New York Hillbilly demands cites and in general makes a jerk of himself - Oh yea - he's still up to it.

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On 3/31/2015 12:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Master of personal slams?
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Monday, March 30, 2015 at 9:47:11 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Years ago (mid 90s) I was the engineer on a tank pull project, removing old underground storage tanks and replacing with ones that met the new standar ds.
The fuel that I pumped out was mostly in very good shape despite being in t he tanks for many years, no sludge or water in the bottom. A lot of it was backup fuel for heating plants that ran on natural gas but needed redundan cy, so it was rarely used and could sit there 10 years plus without being c ycled.
We filled the new tanks with new clean fuel. Two or three years later I had to pump a couple of the tanks for maintenance reasons, and they had a f oot of jelly in the bottom already. I was told the formulation of fuel oil had been changed by the refinery, and it is now more subject to biological attack and decomposition. I have no idea how true that is but I can attes t that the fuel did not last as long as the old fuel did.
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I had to pump a couple of the tanks for maintenance reasons, and they had a foot of jelly in the bottom already. I was told the formulation of fuel o il had been changed by the refinery, and it is now more subject to biologic al attack and decomposition. I have no idea how true that is but I can att est that the fuel did not last as long as the old fuel did.
Alternativly ...is it possible that there was something about the design of the new tanks that allowed more water or condensation to form inside?
Was the venting similar?
In the summer when the heating oil is not being used, I like to seal the ve nt with aluminum foil , just to slow down the intake of moisture a little.
Mark
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wrote:

Used to be that fuel for "prolonged storage" and backup power had "algaecide" added in greater ammonts than standard fuel,and all fuel oil had some. Quite possibly not there in today's low sulphur fuels. There are additives you can buy and add to fuel oil for long term storage.
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